SLS - space launch system (3-я попытка)

Автор Salo, 16.02.2012 10:25:55

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tnt22

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/mobile-launcher-arrives-at-launch-pad-39b-for-tests-preps-for-artemis-i

ЦитатаOct. 20, 2020

Mobile Launcher Arrives at Launch Pad 39B for Tests, Preps for Artemis I

The mobile launcher for Artemis I begins rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building atop crawler-transporter 2 on Oct. 20, 2020.
The mobile launcher for Artemis I begins rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building atop crawler-transporter 2 in the early morning on Oct. 20, 2020, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.
Credits: NASA/Ben Smegelsky

By Linda Herridge
NASA's John F. Kennedy Space Center


The mobile launcher for Artemis I rolls along the crawlerway atop crawler-transporter 2 on Oct. 20, 2020.
In the early morning on Oct. 20, 2020, the mobile launcher for Artemis I rolls along the crawlerway atop crawler-transporter 2 after departing the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.
Credits: NASA/Ben Smegelsky

NASA's mobile launcher that will carry the Space Launch System (SLS) and Orion spacecraft for Artemis I is on the road again. The Exploration Ground Systems and Jacobs teams rolled the mobile launcher, atop crawler-transporter 2, out of the Vehicle Assembly Building for its slow trek to Launch Pad 39B at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Oct. 20.

The roll began just after midnight, and the mobile launcher arrived at the top of the pad Tuesday morning. This trek to the pad will help prepare the launch team for the actual wet dress rehearsal and launch of SLS and Orion on Artemis I next year. The wet dress rehearsal is when SLS and Orion will be rolled out to the pad atop the mobile launcher to practice fueling operations a couple months before launch. The last time the mobile launcher was rolled to the pad was in December 2019.  

During its two-week stay at the pad, engineers will perform several tasks, including a timing test to validate the launch team's countdown timeline, and a thorough, top-to-bottom wash down of the mobile launcher to remove any debris remaining from construction and installation of the umbilical arms.

"While these tasks have been rehearsed individually, the return to Pad 39B allows the team to perform this sequence altogether," said Charlie Blackwell-Thompson, Artemis launch director. 

To begin, technicians will lower the engine service platform that is under the core stage RS-25 engines from the mobile launcher and move it to the launch position. The platform allows access to the engines for routine work or inspections. Engineers and technicians will rehearse a timely completion of removing platforms used to access SLS core stage engines. They will position both side flame deflectors in the flame trench and raise the extensible columns to launch configuration that are critical to support an on-time launch. The extensible columns are designed to provide extra support to the mobile launcher at liftoff, when the loads are the greatest. The team also will perform preparations of mobile launcher umbilical arms along with other mobile launcher and pad subsystems.

"During the Artemis launch countdown, this work will be performed prior to tanking," Blackwell-Thompson said. "As part of this demonstration, the team will exercise the ground hardware in order to determine the timing of these critical elements."

During its time at the pad, the mobile launcher also will receive a bath.

"The wash down will reduce the risk to the SLS/Orion during launch," said Cliff Lanham, EGS flow director. "Some of the debris are inaccessible without using high-pressure water, available at the pad, to get into hard-to-reach areas."

To accomplish the wash down, the team will use the mobile launcher's fire protection system, which has hoses on each level and the deck. The high-pressure flow rate will wash debris into the flame trench, industrial wastewater retention tanks, and percolation ponds. Lanham said this is an added safety measure, in addition to the walk downs performed prior to launch.

While at the pad, the mobile launcher's fire suppression system also will be recertified. The last certification was in December 2019 and is due before launch in November 2021.

Artemis I will test the Orion spacecraft and SLS as an integrated system ahead of crewed flights to the Moon. Under the Artemis program, NASA will land the first woman and the next man on the Moon in 2024.

Last Updated: Oct. 20, 2020
Editor: Linda Herridge

Чебурашка

Какая неожиданность. Кто бы мог подумать  ;D

ЦитатаDeveloping: We're expecting the SLS Green Run test to slip out of November and possibly farther due to issues.

Чебурашка

Пока текущие даты
5 ноября - пробная заправка
27 ноября - собственно огневое испытание

lev_g

Цитата: Чебурашка от 28.10.2020 00:08:34Пока текущие даты
5 ноября - пробная заправка
27 ноября - собственно огневое испытание
Не судьба. Заправки в не будет в ноябре, а возможно и в декабре.

Очень логично. Когда контракт cost+ - зачем летать, если за большие деньги можно не летать?

tnt22

К #2583 - официально

https://blogs.nasa.gov/artemis/2020/10/27/sls-green-run-testing-status-update/


ЦитатаSLS Green Run Testing Status Update

Kathryn Hambleton
Posted Oct 27, 2020 at 5:04 pm


NASA is progressing through the Green Run test series for the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket at the agency's Stennis Space Center in Mississippi and has completed six of the eight tests. The team is preparing to stand down for another tropical weather system that is heading to the area. The pause in work comes ahead of the most complex tests: wet dress rehearsal, when propellant will be loaded for the first time, and hot fire, when all four engines will be fired and every system within the stage will operate. During the pause, engineers will continue to assess data from recent tests to ensure the team is ready to proceed to the next phase of testing. Green Run testing is a complex series of tests to methodically and thoroughly check all the rocket's core stage systems together for the first time to ensure the stage is ready for flight. Check back at this blog for an update on adjusted dates for the Green Run wet dress rehearsal and hot fire tests, after the storm has passed.

tnt22

Уже неплохо...

Цитата Stephen Clark @StephenClark1 1 ч. назад

Update from Stennis Space Center spokesperson after Hurricane Zeta: "We didn't sustain any damage to the test stand or (SLS) core stage. The center is back to normal operations."

Чебурашка

31.10.2020 21:05:40 #2586 Последнее редактирование: 31.10.2020 21:08:36 от Чебурашка
ЦитатаPrelim info notes the Artemis-1 Core Stage weathered Hurricane Zeta without damage. However, the SLS Green Run test schedule is under evaluation due to issues with a LH2 prevalve, and TVC performance during testing.
https://twitter.com/NASASpaceflight/status/1322347099988631552


Проблема в клапане на магистрали жидкого водорода и производительности системы управления вектором тяги.

Интересно, сколько прототипов старшипа успеет построить один фигляр, пока заслуженная фирма поменяет клапан? :D

Crasher

Цитата: Чебурашка от 31.10.2020 21:05:40Интересно, сколько прототипов старшипа успеет построить один фигляр, пока заслуженная фирма поменяет клапан? :D
Пусть мои симпатии на стороне Маска, но.... у каждого из этих двух подходов есть свои плюсы и свои минусы. 
Вот например СЛС выйдет именно таким каким его задумывали, а Старшип ... походу дела будет ясно каким он выйдет.

tnt22

https://blogs.nasa.gov/artemis/2020/11/06/hurricane-zeta-impacts-sls-green-run-testing-status-update/


ЦитатаHurricane Zeta Impacts, SLS Green Run Testing Status Update

Kathryn Hambleton
Posted Nov 6, 2020 at 5:42 pm


NASA has conducted an initial assessment of the impact from Hurricane Zeta at the agency's Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi and Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans. While storm appraisals are continuing, teams have determined that Stennis did sustain some damage on the center, but the B-2 test stand and the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket's core stage for Artemis I, currently in the stand, were not damaged. Michoud experienced damage to the outside and roof of buildings, but there is no damage to the SLS rocket or Orion spacecraft hardware being manufactured at the facility.

Widespread power outages in the area have made assessments difficult at both locations, and some buildings are still without power. While no personal injuries have been reported by NASA employees, many team members are also still without power, have experienced damage to personal property, and have not been able to return to work. Despite stopping work for the pandemic, as well as six Gulf Coast storms, and while working under pandemic-imposed restrictions, NASA and contractors Boeing and Aerojet Rocketdyne continue to make progress on Green Run testing of the SLS core stage at Stennis.

NASA has completed six of the eight core stage Green Run tests and is in the final stage of testing, which will operate the entire stage and its propulsion systems together for the first time. During the pause of on-site work due to the storm, engineers were able to take a closer look at data from recent testing. The team identified one of eight valves, which supply liquid hydrogen to the RS-25 engines, had inconsistent performance during recent tests. The valve is called a prevalve and is part of the core stage main propulsion system. NASA conducts ground testing on the core stage to demonstrate it is ready for flight, and the expert team of problem solvers is prepared to resolve any issues. Engineers have inspected the valve, understand the reason it is not working properly, and plan to repair the valve while the core stage remains in the B-2 test stand. Following a successful repair, the team plans to conduct the Green Run wet dress rehearsal and hot fire testing before the end of the year.

NASA is testing the new core stage on the ground to identify issues before flight, as the agency has done with every new rocket stage ever flown. The Green Run test series is a comprehensive test of the rocket's core stage before it launches Artemis missions to the Moon. Check back at this blog for an update on completion of the repair and an updated schedule for the final Green Run tests.

triage

12.11.2020 21:37:32 #2589 Последнее редактирование: 12.11.2020 21:39:36 от triage
Цитатаhttps://www.appropriations.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/CJSRept.pdf

EXPLANATORY STATEMENT FOR THE DEPARTMENTS OF COMMERCE AND JUSTICE, SCIENCE, AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2021

...
The Committee provides $2,585,900,000 for SLS; $1,406,700,000 for Orion; and $590,000,000 for Exploration Ground Systems. These funding levels reflect consistent programmatic funding to ensure the earliest possible crewed launch of SLS, as well as prepare for future science and crewed missions.
...
Block 1B Development.--The Committee is supportive of fully developing the capabilities of SLS, and directs NASA to continue the simultaneous development of activities as authorized under section 302(c)(1)(a) and (b) of Public Law 111-267. Enabling the evolution of SLS from the vehicle to be used in Artemis-1 to the block 1B variant and eventually the 130 metric ton variant requires the continued development of the interim block 1B variation of SLS, including the continued development of the Exploration Upper Stage [EUS]. It also requires modifications to SLS, the continued construction of a block 1B compatible mobile launch platform [MLP-2], and any additional processing and launch capabilities. To further enable NASA's goals for the Artemis program, the Committee provides no less than $300,000,000 for EUS engine development and associated stage adapter work from within the amounts provided for SLS, and no less than $74,000,000 for MLP-2 from within Exploration Ground Systems.

...

Quetzalcoatl

Цитата: triage от 12.11.2020 21:37:32The Committee provides $2,585,900,000 for SLS; $1,406,700,000 for Orion; and $590,000,000 for Exploration Ground Systems. These funding levels reflect consistent programmatic funding to ensure the earliest possible crewed launch of SLS, as well as prepare for future science and crewed missions.
Ну, все. Теперь им не отвертеться. Придется в следующем году запускать Artemis 1.  ::)

tnt22

https://blogs.nasa.gov/artemis/2020/11/18/engineers-move-forward-with-sls-green-run-testing-valve-repair-complete/


ЦитатаEngineers Move Forward with SLS Green Run Testing, Valve Repair Complete

Kathryn Hambleton
Posted Nov 18, 2020 at 1:06 pm


Over the weekend, engineers at NASA's Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, successfully repaired a valve inside the core stage of the agency's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket. The team designed an innovative tool to remove and replace the valve's faulty clutch while the core stage remained in the B-2 test stand, and without removing the entire valve. Subsequent testing of the repaired valve confirmed that the system is operating as intended.

This week, the team is preparing for the seventh Green Run test, called the wet dress rehearsal, when the stage will be loaded with cryogenic, or super-cold, propellant for the first time. NASA is now targeting the week of Dec. 7 for the wet dress rehearsal and the week of Dec. 21 for the hot fire test. During the hot fire test, all four engines will fire to simulate the stage's operation during launch. The Green Run test series is a comprehensive test of the rocket's core stage before it launches Artemis missions to the Moon. NASA remains on track to launch Artemis I by November 2021.

tnt22

https://blogs.nasa.gov/artemis/2020/11/20/nasa-prepares-for-next-series-of-rs-25-engine-tests-for-sls-rocket/

ЦитатаNASA Prepares for Next Series of RS-25 Engine Tests for SLS Rocket

Kathryn Hambleton
Posted Nov 20, 2020 at 2:52 pm




NASA installed a developmental RS-25 engine into the test stand at Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. This engine will be used in an upcoming test series to gather data and evaluate new components for development and production of new RS-25 engines for future Artemis missions. The new RS-25s will use advanced manufacturing methods and provide increased thrust levels, while also lowering manufacturing costs.

tnt22

http://www.boeing.com/features/2020/11/sls-green-run-test-team-perseveres-through-hurricanes-technical-challenges.page

ЦитатаSLS Green Run test team perseveres through hurricanes, technical challenges

After a valve repair, the Space Launch System core stage is moving forward to wet dress rehearsal and hot fire
November 24, 2020 in Space


Engineers and technicians have successfully repaired a faulty prevalve in the Space Launch System core stage propulsion system while the stage remained in the B-2 test stand at NASA's Stennis Space Center. The core stage is being tested on the ground to identify issues before flight.
NASA photo

Testing of the Boeing-built core stage for NASA's first Space Launch System rocket has been slowed by impacts from five hurricanes and a tropical storm during Gulf Coast storm season, and more recently by a problem with a prevalve on one of the stage's liquid hydrogen propellant feed lines.

But the test team at NASA's Stennis Space Center in Mississippi has persevered through all challenges as the core stage continues its Green Run test series, with just two major tests to go.

During a pause in on-site work for Hurricane Zeta earlier this month, engineers reviewed data from the core stage's first six tests. They focused on inconsistent performance from one of four prevalves that supply liquid hydrogen to the RS-25 engines. Boeing and the valve supplier designed an innovative tool to remove and replace the valve's faulty clutch while the core stage remained in the B-2 test stand, without removing the entire valve. Subsequent testing of the repaired valve confirmed that the system is operating as intended.

"We've got an innovative team, applying decades of knowledge and creative thinking to all problems, and coming up with options that can preserve our schedule," said Mark Nappi, Green Run test director for Boeing. "Hurricane season has consumed our margin, so we're focused on maintaining our schedule to ship to Kennedy Space Center in January, though the next two test dates have moved."

The next Green Run test, wet dress rehearsal, is targeted for the week of Dec. 7. The team will load, control and drain more than 700,000 gallons (roughly 2.6 million liters) of cryogenic propellants and simulate a countdown up to the moment of firing the engines. 

If all goes well with Test 7, the team will move on to Test 8, a full countdown and hot-fire for up to eight minutes. All four RS-25 engines will fire at a full, combined 1.6 million pounds (over 700,000 kilograms) of thrust, just as they will on the launch pad. Thrust increases as the rocket ascends and the atmosphere thins, ultimately reaching the "vacuum" level of more than 2 million pounds (roughly 900,000 kilograms) of thrust.

After that, Boeing engineers and technicians will refurbish the stage and prepare it to be delivered to Kennedy. There, it will be joined with waiting components -- including the Orion human-rated spacecraft and the Boeing-United Launch Alliance Interim Cryogenic Upper Stage -- ahead of launch on NASA's uncrewed Artemis I launch in late 2021.