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SLS - space launch system (3-я попытка)

Автор Salo, 16.02.2012 10:25:55

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Schwalbe

Цитата: Alex_II от 15.05.2020 10:25:39Вяликий Боенг как обычно в последнее время...
Головник по МКС многому научился у отечественных коллег.
Я с детства не любил овал - я с детства угол рисовал.

tnt22

Цитата: undefined Chris B - NSF @NASASpaceflight 1 ч. назад

Carrying the Solid Rocket Motor segments for SLS Artemis-1.

That's a lot of explosive power being hauled right there (but safely). They've suffered a few derailments over the Shuttle era, without any "issue" (other than damaged trains and track).

Цитата: undefined Jon Van Horne 🐴 📷 🌴 @therealjonvh 12 ч. назад

Taken yesterday, UP 7382 leads NS 052 across the NS AGS North. The train is carrying rocket boosters for NASA.

Photos: East Alabama Rail Productions

Изображение Изображение
Изображение Изображение

tnt22

https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/rocket-motors-for-first-nasa-artemis-moon-mission-arrive-at-spaceport


Цитата: undefinedJune 16, 2020
RELEASE 20-064

Rocket Motors for First NASA Artemis Moon Mission Arrive at Spaceport

Twin rocket boosters for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) have arrived at the agency's Kennedy Space Center in Florida
Twin rocket boosters for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) that will power Artemis missions to the Moon have arrived at the agency's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The two motor segments, each comprised of five segments, arrived at Kennedy's Rotation, Processing and Surge Facility (RPSF) on June 15, 2020, by train from a Northrop Grumman manufacturing facility in Promontory, Utah. The booster segments will remain in the RPSF for inspection prior to processing until it's time to move them to the Vehicle Assembly Building for stacking on the mobile launcher. This is the first piece of flight hardware to arrive at Kennedy by train for the Artemis program, but NASA's Exploration Ground Systems (EGS) can expect to receive additional hardware soon, including the Launch Vehicle Service Adapter and the rocket's core stage. NASA is working toward an Artemis I launch date in 2021, keeping the program moving at the best possible pace toward the earliest possible opportunity.
Credits: NASA/Kevin O'Connell


The rocket booster segments that will help power NASA's first Artemis flight test mission around the Moon arrived at the agency's Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Monday for launch preparations.

All 10 segments for the inaugural flight of NASA's first Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and Orion spacecraft were shipped by train from Promontory, Utah. The 10-day, cross-country journey is an important milestone toward the first launch for NASA's Artemis program.

"The arrival of the booster segments at Kennedy is just the beginning of the SLS rocket's journey to the pad and onward to send the Orion spacecraft to the Moon," said NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine. "Artemis I will pave the way toward landing the first woman and the next man on the surface of the Moon in 2024 and expanding human exploration to Mars."

A train transporting the 10 booster segments for NASA's Space Launch System rocket
A train transporting the 10 booster segments for NASA's Space Launch System rocket travels across the Indian River just outside NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida on June 15, 2020. NASA received transfer of the segments at a train yard in Titusville, Florida after departing June 5 from Northrop Grumman's manufacturing facility in Utah. The Shuttle Wagon that once brought the space shuttle boosters onto Kennedy along the same tracks delivered the rocket motors to the center's Rotation, Processing and Surge Facility (RPSF). Kennedy's Exploration Ground Systems team will now prepare them for assembly and integration activities that begin with offloading the segments from the railcars in the RPSF. Teams will attach the aft segments to the aft skirts in the Rotation Building, and store the remaining segments from the railcars in a Surge, or storage, building in preparation for stacking in the Vehicle Assembly Building.
Credits: NASA/ Tony Gray


Each rocket booster has individual motor segments, located between the forward assemblies and aft skirts, making up the largest single component of the entire booster. The two SLS rocket boosters, four RS-25 engines, and core stage, produce a combined total of more than 8.8 million pounds of thrust power during launch.

"It's an exciting time at NASA's Kennedy Space Center as we welcome Artemis flight hardware and continue working toward the Artemis I launch," said Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana.

Each booster segment, weighing 180 tons, is filled with propellant and outfitted with key flight instrumentation. Due to their weight, Northrop Grumman, which is the booster lead contractor, transported the segments in specially outfitted railcars to make the 2,800-mile trip across eight states to Florida's Space Coast.

A train carrying the rocket motors for NASA's Space Launch System rocket
A train carrying the rocket motors for NASA's Space Launch System rocket after departing a Northrop Grumman manufacturing facility in Utah for NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida on June 5, 2020. The 10 booster segments will power Artemis I, the first mission of NASA's Artemis program, to the Moon. The 180-ton booster segments are transported in specially outfitted railcars to make the 2,800-mile trip across eight states to Kennedy.
Credits: Northrop Grumman


"The fully assembled boosters for NASA's Space Launch System rocket are the largest, most powerful solid propellant boosters ever built for flight," said Bruce Tiller, manager of the SLS Boosters Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. "These enormous rocket motors help provide the necessary launch power for the SLS deep space rocket."

Now that the booster segments are at Kennedy, NASA's Exploration Ground Systems team will prepare them for assembly and integration activities that start with offloading the segments. Teams will attach the aft segments to the aft skirts and offload and store the remaining segments from the railcars in preparation for stacking.

"It is good to see booster segments rolling into the Kennedy Space Center," said Mike Bolger, program manager of Exploration Ground Systems. "The team can't wait to get started working on the boosters that will send the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft on the first Artemis mission to the Moon."

The solid rocket boosters are the first elements of the SLS rocket to be installed on the mobile launcher in preparation for launch. The aft booster assemblies will be lifted on to the mobile launcher, followed by the remaining booster segments, and then topped with the forward assembly.

Teams at Kennedy have been preparing for the arrival of the booster segments by assembling and testing the aft skirts and forward assemblies of the boosters, and practicing stacking procedures with booster pathfinders, or hardware replicas, earlier this year. NASA and Northrop Grumman completed casting in 2019 of all 10 of the motor segments for both the first and second Artemis lunar missions, and are now working on the boosters for the Artemis III mission, which will land the first woman and next man on the Moon in 2024.

With the arrival of the boosters, the only remaining pieces of hardware for the Artemis I flight test to be delivered to Kennedy are the launch vehicle stage adapter, which connects the rocket to the Orion spacecraft and will arrive this summer, and the SLS core stage, which will be transported to Kennedy by barge after the Green Run hot fire test later this year at NASA's Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi.

Through the Artemis program, NASA will return astronauts to the Moon's surface in four years. SLS, along with NASA's Orion spacecraft, the Human Landing System and the Gateway in orbit around the Moon, will serve as NASA's backbone for deep space exploration. SLS is the only rocket that can send Orion, astronauts, and supplies to the Moon on a single mission. We'll explore more of the lunar surface than ever before, and collaborate with our commercial and international partners to establish sustainable exploration by the end of the decade. Then, we will use what we learn on and around the Moon to take the next giant leap - sending astronauts to Mars.

-end-

Last Updated: June 16, 2020
Editor: Sean Potter

Max Andriyahov

А сколько стоят эти SRB есть информация? Или хотя бы сколько стоили для Шаттла? Там на один сегмент меньше было

tnt22

Цитата: undefined NASA's Exploration Ground Systems @NASAGroundSys 4 ч. назад

Photos from the Booster Fabrication Facility at @NASAKennedy of the #Artemis I aft skirts for the @NASA_SLS rocket's twin solid rocket boosters being readied for their move to the Rotation, Processing and Surge Facility (RPSF) on June 9, 2020.



tnt22

https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/nasa-prepares-to-complete-artemis-sls-rocket-structural-testing.html


Цитата: undefinedJune 19, 2020

NASA Prepares to Complete Artemis SLS Rocket Structural Testing


The liquid oxygen tank structural test article, shown here, for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket's core stage was the last test article loaded into the test stand July 10, 2019. The liquid oxygen tank is one of two propellant tanks in the rocket's massive core stage that will produce more than 2 million pounds of thrust to help launch Artemis I, the first flight of SLS and NASA's Orion spacecraft to the Moon. Now, the tank will undergo the final test completing a three-year structural test campaign at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Tests conducted during this campaign put the rocket's structures from the top of the upper stage to the bottom of the core stage through strenuous tests simulating the forces that the rocket will experience during launch and flight. All four of the core stage structural test articles were manufactured at NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans and delivered by NASA's barge Pegasus to Marshall.
Credits: NASA/Tyler Martin

View Image Feature

NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) Program is concluding its structural qualification test series with one upcoming final test that will push the design for the rocket's liquid oxygen tank to its limits at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

In the name of science, engineers will try to break a structural test article of the tank--on purpose. The liquid oxygen tank's structure is identical to the tank that is part of the SLS core stage, which will provide power to help launch the Artemis missions to the Moon. The tank is enclosed in a cage-like structure that is part of the test stand. Hydraulic systems will apply millions of pounds of force to push, pull and bend the liquid oxygen tank test article to see just how much pressure the tank can take. The forces simulate what the tank is expected to experience during launch and flight. For the test, the tank will be filled with water to simulate the liquid oxygen propellant used for flight, and when the tank ruptures, the water may create a loud sound as it bursts through the tank's skin.

"We take rocket tanks to extreme limits and break them because pushing systems to the point of failure gives us a data to help us build rockets more intelligently," said Neil Otte, chief engineer for the SLS Stages Office at Marshall. "Breaking the propellant tank today on Earth will provide us with valuable data for safely and efficiently flying SLS on the Artemis missions to the Moon."

Earlier this year, NASA and Boeing engineers subjected the tank to 23 baseline tests that simulate actual flight conditions, and the tank aced the tests. The tank is fitted with thousands of sensors to measure stress, pressure and temperature, while high-speed cameras and microphones capture every moment to identify buckling or cracking in the cylindrical tank wall. This final test will apply controlled forces stronger than those engineers expect the tank to endure during flight, similar to the test that ruptured the liquid hydrogen tank and created noise heard in some Huntsville neighborhoods near Marshall.

This is final test in a series of structural qualification tests that have pushed the rocket's structures to the limits from top to bottom to help ensure the rocket is ready for the Artemis lunar missions. Completion of this upcoming test will mark a major milestone for the SLS Program.

The Marshall team started structural qualification testing on the rocket in May 2017 with an integrated test of the upper part of the rocket stacked together: the Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage, the Orion stage adapter and the launch vehicle stage adapter. Then the team moved on to testing the four largest structures that make up the 212-foot-tall core stage. The last baseline test for Artemis I was completed in March 2020 before the team's access to Marshall was restricted because of the COVID-19 pandemic. The NASA and Boeing team returned to work the first week in June to prepare for conducting the final liquid oxygen test to failure. 

The structural qualification tests help verify models showing the structural design can survive flight. Structural testing has been completed on three of the largest core stage structures: the engine section, the intertank, and the liquid hydrogen tank. The liquid oxygen tank has completed baseline testing and will now wrap up core stage testing with the upcoming test to find the tank's point of failure.

"The liquid oxygen tests and the other tests to find the point of failure really put the hardware through the paces," said April Potter, the SLS test project manager for liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen structural tests. "NASA will now have the information to build upon our systems and push exploration farther than ever before."

The SLS rocket, Orion spacecraft, Gateway and human landing system are part of NASA's backbone for deep space exploration. The Artemis program is the next step in human space exploration. It is part of America's broader Moon to Mars exploration approach, in which astronauts will explore the Moon and gain experience to enable humanity's next giant leap, sending humans to Mars.

Last Updated: June 19, 2020
Editor: Jennifer Harbaugh

tnt22

https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/nasa-prepares-to-complete-artemis-sls-rocket-structural-testing.html


Цитата: undefinedJune 19, 2020

NASA Prepares to Complete Artemis SLS Rocket Structural Testing

SLS Core Stage Test Will Complete Artemis Rocket Structural Test Campaign
The liquid oxygen tank structural test article, shown here, for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket's core stage was the last test article loaded into the test stand July 10, 2019. The liquid oxygen tank is one of two propellant tanks in the rocket's massive core stage that will produce more than 2 million pounds of thrust to help launch Artemis I, the first flight of SLS and NASA's Orion spacecraft to the Moon. Now, the tank will undergo the final test completing a three-year structural test campaign at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Tests conducted during this campaign put the rocket's structures from the top of the upper stage to the bottom of the core stage through strenuous tests simulating the forces that the rocket will experience during launch and flight. All four of the core stage structural test articles were manufactured at NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans and delivered by NASA's barge Pegasus to Marshall.
Credits: NASA/Tyler Martin


NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) Program is concluding its structural qualification test series with one upcoming final test that will push the design for the rocket's liquid oxygen tank to its limits at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

In the name of science, engineers will try to break a structural test article of the tank--on purpose. The liquid oxygen tank's structure is identical to the tank that is part of the SLS core stage, which will provide power to help launch the Artemis missions to the Moon. The tank is enclosed in a cage-like structure that is part of the test stand. Hydraulic systems will apply millions of pounds of force to push, pull and bend the liquid oxygen tank test article to see just how much pressure the tank can take. The forces simulate what the tank is expected to experience during launch and flight. For the test, the tank will be filled with water to simulate the liquid oxygen propellant used for flight, and when the tank ruptures, the water may create a loud sound as it bursts through the tank's skin.

"We take rocket tanks to extreme limits and break them because pushing systems to the point of failure gives us a data to help us build rockets more intelligently," said Neil Otte, chief engineer for the SLS Stages Office at Marshall. "Breaking the propellant tank today on Earth will provide us with valuable data for safely and efficiently flying SLS on the Artemis missions to the Moon."

Earlier this year, NASA and Boeing engineers subjected the tank to 23 baseline tests that simulate actual flight conditions, and the tank aced the tests. The tank is fitted with thousands of sensors to measure stress, pressure and temperature, while high-speed cameras and microphones capture every moment to identify buckling or cracking in the cylindrical tank wall. This final test will apply controlled forces stronger than those engineers expect the tank to endure during flight, similar to the test that ruptured the liquid hydrogen tank and created noise heard in some Huntsville neighborhoods near Marshall.

This is final test in a series of structural qualification tests that have pushed the rocket's structures to the limits from top to bottom to help ensure the rocket is ready for the Artemis lunar missions. Completion of this upcoming test will mark a major milestone for the SLS Program.

The Marshall team started structural qualification testing on the rocket in May 2017 with an integrated test of the upper part of the rocket stacked together: the Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage, the Orion stage adapter and the launch vehicle stage adapter. Then the team moved on to testing the four largest structures that make up the 212-foot-tall core stage. The last baseline test for Artemis I was completed in March 2020 before the team's access to Marshall was restricted because of the COVID-19 pandemic. The NASA and Boeing team returned to work the first week in June to prepare for conducting the final liquid oxygen test to failure. 

The structural qualification tests help verify models showing the structural design can survive flight. Structural testing has been completed on three of the largest core stage structures: the engine section, the intertank, and the liquid hydrogen tank. The liquid oxygen tank has completed baseline testing and will now wrap up core stage testing with the upcoming test to find the tank's point of failure.

"The liquid oxygen tests and the other tests to find the point of failure really put the hardware through the paces," said April Potter, the SLS test project manager for liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen structural tests. "NASA will now have the information to build upon our systems and push exploration farther than ever before."

The SLS rocket, Orion spacecraft, Gateway and human landing system are part of NASA's backbone for deep space exploration. The Artemis program is the next step in human space exploration. It is part of America's broader Moon to Mars exploration approach, in which astronauts will explore the Moon and gain experience to enable humanity's next giant leap, sending humans to Mars.

Last Updated: June 19, 2020
Editor: Jennifer Harbaugh

tnt22

Цитата: undefined Spaceflight Now @SpaceflightNow 3 ч. назад

Elements of the two solid rocket boosters to launch on the first demonstration mission of NASA's Space Launch System previously flew on 40 space shuttle missions (: @northropgrumman).

The boosters won't be recovered & reused for SLS flights.

READ MORE: https://spaceflightnow.com/2020/06/22/sls-booster-segments-arrive-in-florida-but-stacking-will-wait-for-key-core-stage-test/...



tnt22

Цитата: undefined NASA's Exploration Ground Systems @NASAGroundSys 5 ч. назад

Technicians ready two @NASA_SLS rocket boosters for mating to the rocket's two aft skirts on June 19th, inside the Rotation, Processing and Surge Facility at @NASAKennedy. Together, the twin boosters provide more than 75 percent of the total SLS thrust at launch.
#Artemis



opinion

Цитата: tnt22 от 24.06.2020 22:34:19
Вот этот в красной майке - с ФНК. Шпионит с целью выведать, что делать с чертежами формата А1 после внедрения безбумажного документооборота.
The trajectory is temporarily deviated. Skybot not to blame.

Bell

Цитата: opinion от 25.06.2020 13:33:14что делать с чертежами формата А1 после внедрения безбумажного документооборота.
Иногда мне кажется что мы черти, которые штурмуют небеса (с) фон Браун

tnt22

Цитата: undefinedWater Gushes From SLS Rocket Propellant Tank As Engineers Break It On Purpose

 NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

25 июн. 2020 г.

To complete the structural qualification test campaign for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, the liquid oxygen structural test article was pushed beyond its limits until it broke and water gushed from the tank .The tank is a test article that is identical to part of the SLS core stage that will produce 200 million pounds of thrust to launch the rocket. The tank was bolted into a massive steel ring at the base of Marshall's Test Stand 4697. Hydraulic cylinders were then calibrated and positioned along the tank to apply millions of pounds of crippling force from all sides while engineers measured and recorded the effects of the launch and flight forces. For the test on June 24, water used to simulate the liquid oxygen flows out of the tank after it ruptures. The structural test campaign was conducted on the rocket to ensure the SLS rocket's structure can endure the rigors of launch and safely send astronauts to the Moon on the Artemis missions. (NASA/David Olive)

youtu.be/sSEh_oKLCAw

(0:11)

tnt22

https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/nasa-completes-artemis-sls-structural-testing-campaign.html


Цитата: undefinedJune 25, 2020

NASA Completes Artemis Space Launch System Structural Testing Campaign

On June 24, 2020, engineers completed the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket's structural testing campaign for the Artemis lunar missions by testing the liquid oxygen structural test article to find its point of failure.

"The Space Launch System and Marshall test team have done a tremendous job of accomplishing this test program, marking a major milestone not only for the SLS Program but also for the Artemis program," said John Honeycutt, the SLS Program Manager. "From building the test stands, support equipment and test articles to conducting the tests and analyzing the data, it is remarkable work that will help send astronauts to the Moon."

For the final test, the liquid oxygen tank test article -- measuring 70 feet tall and 28 feet in diameter -- was bolted into a massive 185,000-pound steel ring at the base of Marshall's Test Stand 4697. Hydraulic cylinders were then calibrated and positioned all along the tank to apply millions of pounds of crippling force from all sides while engineers measured and recorded the effects of the launch and flight forces. The liquid oxygen tank circumferentially failed in the weld location as engineers predicted and at the approximate load levels expected, proving flight readiness and providing critical data for the tank's designers. The test concluded at approximately 9 p.m. CT. This final test to failure on the LOX STA met all the program milestones.


Engineers completed almost 200 tests on the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket by breaking the liquid oxygen tank test article. This test was the last in a 3-year structural campaign to ensure the rocket's structure was designed to endure the rigors of spacefllight. The tests were essential for safely sending astronauts to space on the Artemis missions the Moon. First, engineers used computer modeling to design the rocket's major structures to specific factors of safety. Then, they anchored those models with testing to see if the model's predictions are correct. More than 20 SLS structural tests showed that the liquid oxygen tank would survive the forces predicted to occur during launch and flight. The June 24 test pushed the tank beyond its limits to see how much force it would take to break the tank's structure. This image shows water gushing out of the tank as it failed. The resulted circumferential buckling of the structure occurred within 2% of the predicted failure value. The test results will provide rocket designers with valuable information for making the SLS tanks lighter and for informing the designs of other government and commercial rockets.
Credits: NASA/David Olive
View Image Feature


The successful completion of SLS structural qualification testing at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama wraps up the largest test campaign at the center since tests conducted for the Space Shuttle Program, more than 30 years ago. During the test campaign five structural test articles underwent 199 separate test cases and more than 421 gigabytes of data were collected to add to computer models used to design the rocket. The final test marks the achievement of all SLS structural testing requirements prior to the Artemis I mission --  the first in a series of increasingly complex missions that will enable human exploration to the Moon and Mars.

Earlier this year, NASA and engineers from Boeing, the core stage prime contractor, completed 24 baseline tests that simulated actual flight conditions on the liquid oxygen structural test article. For all the tests, thousands of sensors measure stress, pressure and temperature while high-speed cameras and microphones sought to identify any buckling or cracking in the tank's cylindrical wall. The data gathered from this baseline test helped qualify the SLS core stage structures and integrated upper stage for flight.

The Marshall team has been conducting structural qualification testing on the rocket since May 2017 with an integrated test of the upper part of the rocket stacked together -- including the interim cryogenic propulsion stage, the Orion stage adapter and the launch vehicle stage adapter. That was followed by testing of the four largest structures that compose the core stage -- the engine section, the intertank, the liquid hydrogen tank and the liquid oxygen tank. Each of these tests provided additional data to computer models that predict how the structures will perform under the harsh conditions of launch and flight.

"The Marshall test lab team has worked closely with the Space Launch System Program to test the rocket's structures from the top to bottom," said Ralph Carruth, Marshall's test lab director. "After watching the test stands being built, working alongside SLS and Boeing engineers to establish testing procedures and conducting and gathering results of five structural qualifying tests, we are proud to contribute data shows these structures can withstand the rigors of flight."

With the conclusion of testing, designers now have data that may be helpful in optimizing SLS hardware. SLS will have the power to send astronauts forward to the Moon and ultimately to Mars. Testing the new, complex pieces of hardware is critical to the success not only of the first flight test of SLS and NASA's Orion spacecraft, but also to all future missions.

"This year is a landmark year for core stage testing for the Artemis missions," said Julie Bassler, the SLS stages manager. "We have successfully completed our core stage major structural tests at Marshall Space Flight Center and are making progress on Green Run testing of the Artemis I core stage at Stennis Space Center that will simulate launch. All these tests are not only valuable for the first Artemis mission but also validates the new integrated design of the SLS core stage structure, propulsion and avionics systems and ensures its readiness for future flights."
 
To complete the structural qualification test campaign for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, the liquid oxygen structural test article was pushed beyond its limits until it broke and water gushed from the tank. The tank is a test article that is part of the SLS core stage that will produce 2 million pounds of thrust to help launch the rocket. The tank was bolted into a massive steel ring at the base of Marshall's Test Stand 4697. Hydraulic cylinders were then calibrated and positioned along the tank to apply millions of pounds of crippling force from all sides while engineers measured and recorded the effects of the launch and flight forces. For the test on June 24, water used to simulate the liquid oxygen flows out of the tank after it ruptures. The structural test campaign was conducted on the rocket to ensure the SLS rocket's structure can endure the rigors of launch and safely send astronauts to the Moon on the Artemis missions.
Credits: NASA/David Olive


Teams at Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi are making progress on Green Run testing of the assembled SLS core stage for the Artemis Imission. At NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, Boeing, the core stage prime contractor, has manufactured all the main core stage structures for the Artemis II mission and started work on Artemis III structures. The 212-foot-tall core stage is the largest, most complex rocket stage NASA has built since the Saturn V stages that powered the Apollo missions to the Moon. Aerojet Rocketdyne has assembled engines for the Artemis II mission and is in the process of assembling Artemis III engines Northrop Grumman recently delivered booster segments to the NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida where they are being prepared for launch. All 10 of the segments for the second Artemis mission are cast, and Northrop Grumman is now working on the boosters for Artemis III. With the arrival of the boosters to Kennedy, the only remaining pieces of hardware for the Artemis I flight test to be delivered are the launch vehicle stage adapter, which connects the rocket to the Orion spacecraft and will arrive this summer, and the SLS core stage, which will be transported to Kennedy by barge after the Green Run hot fire test at Stennis later this year.

The SLS rocket, Orion spacecraft, Gateway and human landing system are part of NASA's backbone for deep space exploration. The Artemis program is the next step in human space exploration. It's part of America's broader Moon to Mars exploration approach, in which astronauts will explore the Moon and experience gained there to enable humanity's next giant leap, sending humans to Mars.

Last Updated: June 26, 2020
Editor: Jennifer Harbaugh

tnt22

Цитата: undefined Chris G - NSF @ChrisG_NSF 1 ч. назад

Teams from @BoeingSpace have returned to work on @NASA_SLS Core Stage. BUT a lot of work remains before teams can get to the Wet Dress Rehearsal & Hot Fire tests - tracking No Earlier Than September/October at this point.

Philip Sloss breaks it down: https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2020/06/boeing-sls-core-green-run/ ...

Цитата: undefined
Boeing powers up first SLS Core Stage for Green Run system checkouts - NASASpaceFlight.com
Boeing powered up the Core State for the first Space Launch System on the B-2...

nasaspaceflight.com

vissarion

Цитата: Max Andriyahov от 18.06.2020 15:46:37А сколько стоят эти SRB есть информация? Или хотя бы сколько стоили для Шаттла? Там на один сегмент меньше было
RSRM (один 4 сегментный) стоил $60M
RSRMV больше на 25% + инфляция + меньше серия

Max Andriyahov

Цитата: vissarion от 30.06.2020 05:42:02
Цитата: Max Andriyahov от 18.06.2020 15:46:37А сколько стоят эти SRB есть информация? Или хотя бы сколько стоили для Шаттла? Там на один сегмент меньше было
RSRM (один 4 сегментный) стоил $60M
RSRMV больше на 25% + инфляция + меньше серия

Спасибо! А где про это можно почитать? Сходу не нагуглил

vissarion

Цитата: Max Andriyahov от 30.06.2020 05:45:20Спасибо! А где про это можно почитать? Сходу не нагуглил

например здесь или здесь

около $3 млрд за 35 пар (70 ускорителей) в 2000х долларах

Там ещё сложно искать потому что они переименовывается каждые несколько лет лет:

Morton Thiokol → Cordiant → Alcoa → ATK → Orbital ATK → Northrop Grumman Innovation Systems (NGIS)

tnt22

https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/nasa-checks-out-sls-core-stage-avionics-for-artemis-I-mission.html

Цитата: undefinedJune 30, 2020

NASA Checks Out SLS Core Stage Avionics for Artemis I Mission

before
after

The flight computers and avionics of NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket's core stage for the Artemis I mission were powered on and have completed a thorough systems checkout. The test used Green Run software that was developed for the test and loaded in the flight computers for the first time. The SLS avionics power on and checkout was the second of eight tests in the Green Run test series at NASA's Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, where the core stage is installed in the B-2 Test Stand. The test steadily brought the core stage flight hardware, which controls the rocket's first eight minutes of flight, to life for the first time. The three flight computers and avionics are located in the forward skirt, the top section of the 212-foot tall core stage, with more avionics distributed in the core's intertank and engine section as shown in the right image. Engineers from NASA and Boeing, the core stage prime contractor, worked in control rooms as the avionic systems inside the Artemis I core stage, shown in the left image, were checked out. While this is the first time the Green Run software was used to control all the avionics in the flight core stage, engineers qualified the avionics and computers with earlier tests in the Systems Integration and Test Facility at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

The core stage will provide more than 2 million pounds of thrust to help launch Artemis I, the first in a series of increasingly complex missions to the Moon through NASA's Artemis program. NASA is working to land the first woman and next man on the Moon by 2024. SLS is part of NASA's backbone for deep space exploration, along with NASA's Orion spacecraft, the human landing system, and the Gateway in orbit around the Moon.

Image Credit: NASA

Last Updated: July 1, 2020
Editor: Jennifer Harbaugh

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https://blogs.nasa.gov/kennedy/2020/07/07/nasa-pins-down-first-step-in-sls-stacking-for-artemis-i/
https://blogs.nasa.gov/artemis/2020/07/07/nasa-pins-down-first-step-in-sls-stacking-for-artemis-i/


ЦитатаNASA Pins Down First Step in SLS Stacking for Artemis I

Linda Herridge
Posted Jul 7, 2020 at 3:04 pm



Inside the Rotation, Processing and Surge Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Payton Jones, at left, a launch vehicle processing technician, and Bradley Bundy, a spaceflight technician, both with Jacobs, complete the first mate pinning of the right-hand motor segment to the right-hand aft skirt on one of the two solid rocket boosters for the agency's Space Launch System. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

About a dozen technicians and engineers from Exploration Ground Systems worked together recently at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to carry out the first step in stacking the twin solid rocket boosters that help launch NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket for the first Artemis lunar mission

Inside the Florida spaceport's Rotation, Processing and Surge Facility, the NASA and Jacobs team completed a pin. The pinning activity involved using bolts to attach one of five segments that make up one of two solid rocket boosters for SLS to the rocket's aft skirt. A crane crew assisted in mating the aft segments to the rocket's two aft skirts.


Inside the Rotation, Processing and Surge Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Pablo Martinez, a handling, mechanical and structures engineer on the Jacobs Technology Inc. Test and Operations Support Contract, prepares to insert the first of many pins that will secure the Space Launch System's right-hand motor segment to the rocket's right-hand aft skirt. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

A handful of the team members gained pinning experience on boosters for the space shuttle, while the rest were first-time pinners. Pablo Martinez, Jacobs TOSC handling, mechanical and structures engineer, inserted the first of 177 pins per joint to complete the first official step in stacking the SLS boosters.

The next step is a move to Kennedy's iconic Vehicle Assembly Building to await stacking on the mobile launcher.

Manufactured by Northrop Grumman in Utah, the 177-foot-tall twin boosters provide more than 75 percent of the total SLS thrust at launch. SLS is the most powerful rocket NASA has ever built.

The SLS rocket will launch NASA's Orion spacecraft and send it to the Moon for Artemis I -- a mission to test the two as an integrated system, leading up to human missions to the Moon. Under the Artemis program, NASA will land the first woman and the next man on the Moon by 2024.

View a video of booster segment mate pinning.

https://images-assets.nasa.gov/video/KSC-20200625-MH-JBS02_0001-Artemis_I_Booster_Segment_Mate_Pinning_Operation-3253034/KSC-20200625-MH-JBS02_0001-Artemis_I_Booster_Segment_Mate_Pinning_Operation-3253034~medium.mp4 (3:21)

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Цитата Boeing Space @BoeingSpace 8 июл.

Check out the 2nd @NASA_SLS core stage that will launch the crewed #Artemis II mission around the moon. It's making progress at #NASAMichoud.
https://video.twimg.com/ext_tw_video/1280879338985009153/pu/vid/1280x720/m4YViSr0DG5u-1ND.mp4 (0:34)