DSCOVR – Falcon 9 v1.1 – Canaveral SLC-40 – 11.02.2015 23:03 UTC

Автор che wi, 21.11.2014 20:00:23

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Alex_II

ЦитатаАнтон пишет:
так а разве по энергетике отлетная вL1 не более затратна чем ГПО?
Так DSCOVR - аппарат небольшой, что-то около 500кг.
И мы пошли за так, на четвертак, за ради бога
В обход и напролом и просто пылью по лучу...


Salo

http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2015/01/spacex-static-fire-test-dscovr-mission/
ЦитатаSpaceX has conducted a Static Fire test on its latest Falcon 9 v1.1 rocket Saturday, paving the way for a February 8 launch attempt to loft the DSCOVR spacecraft uphill from Cape Canaveral's SLC-40. The launch will also mark the second attempt to conduct a propulsive landing of the core stage on to the Autonomous Spaceport Drone Ship (ASDS).
"Были когда-то и мы рысаками!!!"


Salo

http://spaceflightnow.com/2015/02/03/noaa-space-weather-sentinel-joined-with-falcon-9-rocket/
ЦитатаNOAA space weather sentinel joined with Falcon 9 rocket       
Posted on February 3, 2015 by Stephen Clark  

The Deep Space Climate Observatory is pictured inside the Astrotech satellite processing facility in Titusville, Florida. One half of the Falcon 9 rocket's payload fairing is seen behind the spacecraft. Credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
 
A new space weather observatory to be stationed a million miles fr om Earth has been enclosed inside the nose cone of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket for liftoff Sunday from Cape Canaveral.
The Deep Space Climate Observatory was filled with maneuvering fuel, tested and verified ready for launch, then encapsulated inside the Falcon 9 launcher's 5.2-meter (17.1-foot) diameter payload fairing at the Astrotech spacecraft processing facility near Kennedy Space Center.
The satellite rolled out of Astrotech on Saturday night for a short road trip to SpaceX's Falcon 9 hangar at Cape Canaveral's Complex 40 launch pad. Once it arrived, the payload housing was tilted on its side and hooked up to the Falcon 9's second stage.
Final testing is underway this week to ensure the refrigerator-sized spacecraft and the rocket work together. The booster should be rolled out of the hangar and erected on the launch pad this weekend.
The Falcon 9 rocket has completed a brief on-pad firing of its nine Merlin 1D first stage engines in a customary preflight test after a practice countdown.
Liftoff of the 22-story rocket is set for 6:10 p.m. EST (2310 GMT) Sunday, about two minutes after sunset on Florida's Space Coast.
The Falcon 9's 15th flight will send DSCOVR on a high-speed trajectory to escape the grip of Earth's gravity.
DSCOVR is a joint project between NOAA, NASA and the U.S. Air Force. The satellite will be positioned at the L1 libration point a million miles away from Earth, wh ere its instruments will monitor space weather and the solar wind for a planned five-year mission.

The Air Force arranged the DSCOVR mission's liftoff with SpaceX, paying the California-based space transportation company $97 million under a launch services contract signed in December 2012.
NOAA is the overall manager of the DSCOVR program, with NASA assisting with satellite preparation and prelaunch processing.
The Air Force signed the DSCOVR launch order -- plus a Falcon Heavy launch reserved for multiple defense-related experimental satellites -- under the service's Orbital/Suborbital Program 3 (OSP 3) contract, which allows contractors to compete to launch the military's smaller spacecraft.
SpaceX and the Air Force expect to complete certification of the Falcon 9 rocket to launch more critical Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle-class (EELV-class) national security satellites later this year. The certification will allow SpaceX to compete directly against United Launch Alliance for the military's most expensive communications, navigation and spy satellites.
ULA is not part of the OSP 3 contract, and the incumbent EELV contractor did not bid to launch the DSCOVR mission.
SpaceX plans a second try to recover the Falcon 9 rocket's first stage booster during Sunday's launch. An untried rocket-assisted flyback maneuver on SpaceX's last launch Jan. 10 guided the 14-story booster to a football field-sized barge in the Atlantic Ocean, but the company said the rocket's stabilizing winglets ran out of hydraulic fluid on final descent to a vertical propulsive landing.
The booster crashed on the landing platform, but SpaceX recovered wreckage and returned the debris to port aboard the barge.
The Falcon 9 rocket with DSCOVR carries additional hydraulic fluid to avoid a recurrence of the problem.
Engineers will inspect the Falcon 9 booster if the flyback experiment works as designed on Sunday's flight, determining what work is required to refurbish the rocket for another mission.
SpaceX hopes to make the Falcon 9 rocket's first stage reusable in the future in a bid to cut the cost of space launches.

Follow Stephen Clark on Twitter: @StephenClark1.
"Были когда-то и мы рысаками!!!"


Lanista

ЦитатаPirat5 пишет:
570 kg
А ведь это была ниша Орбитал?

napalm

Видать решили что Орбитал шлепнул достаточно научных спутников  :D

Alex_II

ЦитатаLanista пишет:
А ведь это была ниша Орбитал?
Чем бы Орбитал уволок её в точку L1?
И мы пошли за так, на четвертак, за ради бога
В обход и напролом и просто пылью по лучу...


Alex_II

ЦитатаLanista пишет:
Minotaur V не?
Не, он даже на стандартную ГПО 570 кг не вытащит (только 530)
И мы пошли за так, на четвертак, за ради бога
В обход и напролом и просто пылью по лучу...

Salo

http://spaceflightnow.com/2015/02/06/near-ideal-weather-expected-for-sundays-falcon-9-launch/
ЦитатаNear-ideal weather expected for Sunday's Falcon 9 launch       
Posted on February 6, 2015 by Stephen Clark

File photo of a Falcon 9 rocket inside SpaceX's hangar at Cape Canaveral before a previous launch. Credit: SpaceX
 
Forecasters predict mostly clear skies, light winds and comfortable temperatures for Sunday's launch of a Falcon 9 rocket with a NOAA satellite designed to warn of solar storms that could disrupt navigation and communication technology on Earth.
The Deep Space Climate Observatory is set for liftoff fr om Cape Canaveral's Complex 40 launch pad at 6:10:12 p.m. EST (2310:12 GMT) Sunday in an instantaneous launch opportunity.
The launch is scheduled two minutes after sunset at Cape Canaveral, and could create a dusk spectacle as the 22-story launcher rises into sunlight.
The two-stage Falcon 9 rocket will deploy the refrigerator-sized satellite in space about 30 minutes after launch, sending DSCOVR on a high-speed trajectory to escape the bonds of Earth's gravity.
DSCOVR's final station will be at the L1 libration point, a gravitationally-stable location a million miles from the day side of Earth.
A NASA spokesperson said a launch readiness review Friday gave the go-ahead to continue with final launch preparations, including rollout of the Falcon 9 from its processing hangar to the Complex 40 launch pad, wh ere it will be rotated vertical for Sunday's countdown.

Credit: NOAA
 
The official weather forecast issued by the U.S. Air Force's 45th Weather Squadron on Friday calls for a less than 10 percent chance conditions could violate the Falcon 9 rocket's weather constraints.
"A high pressure area drops south into Florida on Saturday and Sunday, allowing for plenty of sunshine and temperatures near 70 degrees Fahrenheit along the Space Coast," forecasters wrote in a weather summary. "There is very little threat of any launch weather rule violations. Maximum upper winds will be from the northwest at 40 knots near 42,000 feet."
The forecast calls for a few cumulus clouds at 3,000 feet and a layer of scattered cirrostratus clouds at 26,000 feet. Winds will be from the southeast at 8 to 12 mph, and temperature at launch time will be around 68 degrees Fahrenheit.
The only slight chance of exceeding a launch weather constraint will be with the cumulus cloud rule, according to the forecast.
If the launch is delayed to Monday -- when the launch time would be 6:07 p.m. EST (2307 GMT) -- there is an 80 percent chance of acceptable weather, with the main worry being thick clouds from an approaching cold front.
"Были когда-то и мы рысаками!!!"

Salo

07.02.2015 09:40:50 #32 Последнее редактирование: 07.02.2015 09:41:45 от Salo
http://spaceflightnow.com/2015/02/07/falcon-9-launch-timeline-with-dscovr/
ЦитатаFalcon 9 launch timeline with DSCOVR       
Posted on February 7, 2015 by Stephen Clark

Follow the key events of the Falcon 9 rocket's ascent into orbit from Cape Canaveral with NOAA's Deep Space Climate Observatory. Exact times for re-entry and landing of the Falcon 9's first stage have not been released by SpaceX.
Data source: NOAA/U.S. Air Force

T-0:00:00: Liftoff

After the rocket's nine Merlin engines pass an automated health check, four hold-down clamps will release the Falcon 9 booster for liftoff from Complex 40.
 
T+0:01:10: Mach 1

The Falcon 9 rocket reaches Mach 1, the speed of sound.
 
T+0:01:18: Max Q

The Falcon 9 rocket reaches Max Q, the point of maximum aerodynamic pressure.
 
T+0:02:46: MECO

Moments after two of the Falcon 9's first stage engines shut down, the remaining seven Merlin engines cut off.
 
T+0:02:50: Stage 1 Separation

The Falcon 9's first stage separates from the second stage four seconds after MECO. The spent stage will descend back to Earth for an attempted landing on a barge in the Atlantic Ocean.
 
T+0:02:57: Stage 2 Ignition

The second stage Merlin 1D vacuum engine ignites for an approximately 6-minute burn.
 
T+0:03:29: Fairing Jettison

The 5.2-meter (17.1-foot) diameter payload fairing jettisons once the Falcon 9 rocket ascends through the dense lower atmosphere. The 43-foot-tall fairing is made of two clamshell-like halves composed of carbon fiber with an aluminum honeycomb core.
 
T+0:08:37: SECO 1

The second stage of the Falcon 9 rocket shuts down after completing the first of two burns to inject the Deep Space Climate Observatory on an escape trajectory.
 
T+0:09:00: First Stage Landing

The Falcon 9's first stage will land on SpaceX's autonomous spaceport drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean.
 
T+0:25:40: Second Stage Restart

The second stage Merlin 1D vacuum engine reignites for a brief firing to propel the Deep Space Climate Observatory away from Earth. The duration of the second burn has not been released.
 
T+0:30:42: DSCOVR Separation

The Deep Space Climate Observatory separates from the Falcon 9 rocket upper stage en route to the L1 libration point.
 
Follow Stephen Clark on Twitter: @StephenClark1.
"Были когда-то и мы рысаками!!!"

Salo

http://spaceflightnow.com/2015/02/07/photos-dscovr-buttoned-up-for-falcon-9-launch/
ЦитатаPhotos: DSCOVR buttoned up for Falcon 9 launch       
Posted on February 7, 2015 by Stephen Clark

Engineers worked inside a climate-controlled clean room for two months to ready NOAA's new space weather observatory for launch aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket.
The Deep Space Climate Observatory, equipped to detect incoming solar storms and give scientists a new view of Earth's climate, will blast off aboard a Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral. The refrigerator-sized satellite arrived at the Astrotech spacecraft processing facility in November after a road trip from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland.
DSCOVR was originally conceived in the late 1990s by former Vice President Al Gore, but the mission was shelved and the spacecraft placed in storage until the project received a new lease on life.
The photos below show the satellite being unwrapped after shipment to Florida, a light test to check out its power-generating solar arrays, and preparations to be enclosed inside the Falcon 9 rocket's 43-foot-tall two-piece payload fairing. 
 

Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett


Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky


Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky


Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky


Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky


Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky


Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky


Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky


Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett


Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett


Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett


Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett


Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett


Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
 
Follow Stephen Clark on Twitter: @StephenClark1.
"Были когда-то и мы рысаками!!!"

Прол

Так летит через 2 часа или нет?

Прол

08.02.2015 00:21:16 #35 Последнее редактирование: 08.02.2015 10:25:21 от Прол
Идет трансляция брифинга по 
http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/#.VNaASUsvNLQ

Прол

Вероятность переноса из-за погоды <10%.

Salo

ЦитатаПрол пишет:
Так летит через 2 часа или нет?
Летит через сутки и два часа.
"Были когда-то и мы рысаками!!!"

Alex_II

ЦитатаSalo пишет:
Летит через сутки и два часа.
Во сколько по Москве? 2 часа ночи 9.02? Или в час?
И мы пошли за так, на четвертак, за ради бога
В обход и напролом и просто пылью по лучу...

Искандер

08.02.2015 01:44:03 #39 Последнее редактирование: 08.02.2015 01:58:42 от Искандер
ЦитатаAlex_II пишет:
ЦитатаSalo пишет:
Летит через сутки и два часа.
Во сколько по Москве? 2 часа ночи 9.02? Или в час?
Смотрите по Веб-касту (http://www.spacex.com/webcast/) и считайте, там давным-давно обратный отсчет включен. Удобно.
DSCOVR Launch
Aures habent et non audient, oculos habent et non videbunt