Solar Probe Plus (солнечный зонд NASA) – Delta IV Heavy – Canaveral SLC-37B – июль 2018

Автор che wi, 06.01.2014 22:46:44

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Чебурашка

Цитатаsol написал:
Строго говоря, этим он Венеру тоже приблизит к Солнцу. На пару ангстрем...
               
                  

Наоборот.
Аппарат уменьшил полуось своей гелиоцентрической орбиты, а значит и полную энергию,
а, следовательно, Венера должна увеличить - т.е. удалиться немножко от Солнца.

tnt22

Источник
ЦитатаSounds of the Solar Wind from NASA's Parker Solar Probe

JHU Applied Physics Laboratory

14 янв. 2020 г.

There's a wind that emanates from the Sun. It blows not like a soft whistle but like a hurricane's scream. Made of electrons, protons and heavier ions, the solar wind courses through the solar system at roughly 1 million mph (1.6 million kph), barreling over everything in its path. Yet through the wind's roar, NASA's Parker Solar Probe hears the small chirps, squeaks and rustles that hint at the origin of this mysterious and ever-present wind. The spacecraft's FIELDS instrument can eavesdrop on the electric and magnetic fluctuations caused by plasma waves. The Parker Solar Probe it can "hear" when the waves and particles interact with one another, recording frequency and amplitude information about these plasma waves that scientists could then play as sound waves. And it results in some striking sounds.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aOA_wAoh5gohttps://www.youtube.com/embed/aOA_wAoh5go (1:28)


tnt22

https://blogs.nasa.gov/parkersolarprobe/2020/01/23/parker-solar-probe-prepares-for-new-science-new-records-on-fourth-solar-orbit/
ЦитатаParker Solar Probe Prepares for New Science, New Records on Fourth Solar Orbit

Sarah Frazier
Posted Jan 23, 2020 at 11:00 am

NASA's Parker Solar Probe began its fourth solar encounter today at 9:00 a.m. EST, at a distance of about 23.3 million miles from the Sun's surface. It will reach perihelion, its closest distance to our star, during this orbit on Jan. 29 at about 4:30 a.m. EST.


Parker Solar Probe began its fourth solar encounter on Jan. 23, 2020. Track the spacecraft's speed and position online.

The fourth perihelion will send the spacecraft within 11.6 million miles of the Sun, closer than its first three perihelia, which were at about 15 million miles from the Sun. The spacecraft's four instrument suites will acquire data in this new environment, sampling this previously unexplored region around the Sun and potentially revealing new information about the solar wind and atmosphere.

Parker Solar Probe's first three orbits of the Sun were all approximately the same distance from our star. Following the mission's second Venus flyby on Dec. 26, 2019, and after one trajectory correction maneuver on Jan. 10, the spacecraft will set new records for distance from the Sun and fastest human-made object during its fourth perihelion; both records are currently held by Parker Solar Probe.

By Geoff Brown

Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab

tnt22


tnt22

https://blogs.nasa.gov/parkersolarprobe/2020/01/29/parker-solar-probe-completes-fourth-closest-approach-breaks-new-speed-and-distance-records/
ЦитатаParker Solar Probe Completes Fourth Closest Approach, Breaks New Speed and Distance Records

Sarah Frazier
Posted Jan 29, 2020 at 10:30 am


At 4:37 a.m. EST on Jan. 29, 2020, NASA's Parker Solar Probe broke speed and distance records as it completed its fourth close approach of the Sun. The spacecraft traveled 11.6 million miles from the Sun's surface at perihelion, reaching a speed of 244,225 miles per hour. These achievements topple Parker Solar Probe's own previous records for closest spacecraft to the Sun -- previously about 15 million miles from the Sun's surface -- and fastest human-made object, before roughly 213,200 miles per hour.

Parker Solar Probe will continue to fly ever closer to the Sun on its seven-year journey, exploring regions of space never visited before and providing scientists with key measurements to help unveil the mysteries of the solar corona and wind.

As with most of Parker Solar Probe's close approaches, the spacecraft is out of contact with Earth for several days around perihelion.

By Justyna Surowiec

Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab

tnt22

https://blogs.nasa.gov/parkersolarprobe/2020/02/01/parker-solar-probe-reports-successful-record-setting-fourth-close-encounter-of-the-sun/
ЦитатаParker Solar Probe Reports Successful Record-Setting Fourth Close Encounter of the Sun

Sarah Frazier
Posted Feb 1, 2020 at 8:21 am


NASA's Parker Solar Probe is healthy and operating as designed following its fourth close approach to the Sun, called perihelion, on Jan. 29.

Mission controllers at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland, received a "status A" beacon from the spacecraft at 5:20 a.m. EST on Feb. 1. Status A is the best of four possible status signals, and indicates that the spacecraft is operating nominally and the instrument suites are collecting science data. This status also indicates that any minor issues that may have occurred were identified and resolved by Parker Solar Probe's onboard autonomy and fault management systems.

During this perihelion, Parker Solar Probe broke its own records for speed and proximity to the Sun for a human-made object. The spacecraft reached a speed of 244,255 miles per hour (about 393,044 kilometers per hour) as it whipped around the Sun at a distance of 11.6 million miles (about 18.6 million kilometers).

Parker Solar Probe's heat shield, called the Thermal Protection System, or TPS, reached new record temperatures as well. At this distance from the Sun, computer modeling estimates show that the Sun-facing side of the TPS experienced a blazing 1,134 degrees Fahrenheit (612 degrees C), about 300 degrees hotter than encountered on the spacecraft's previous three perihelia. The spacecraft and instruments behind this protective heat shield remained at a temperature of about 85 F (30 C). During the spacecraft's closest three perihelia in 2024-25, the TPS will see temperatures around 2,500 F (1,370 C).

As the mission team learns more about operations and conditions in this region of space, they have increased the amount of time the instruments are on and gathering data. Parker Solar Probe's fourth solar encounter phase began on Jan. 23, and the spacecraft will continue to acquire science data through Feb. 29, beyond the originally-planned end of the solar encounter phase on Feb. 4. This solar encounter data will be downlinked to Earth beginning in March.

By Geoff Brown

Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab

Raul

Земля не может, не может не вращаться,
А мур не может, не может не мурчать!

tnt22

https://blogs.nasa.gov/parkersolarprobe/2020/04/15/data-from-parker-solar-probes-third-orbit-now-available-to-the-public/
ЦитатаData from Parker Solar Probe's Third Orbit Now Available to the Public

Sarah Frazier
Posted Apr 15, 2020 at 11:01 am


NASA's Parker Solar Probe team released a second collection of science data to the public on April 14, 2020. The release includes science data from all four of Parker Solar Probe's instrument suites, spanning the mission's third orbit around the Sun, which began on June 18, 2019 and completed on November 15, 2019. Also included are high-resolution measurements from the FIELDS and SWEAP instruments.

The data files and graphical displays can be accessed through NASA's Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) and Solar Data Analysis Center (SDAC), the APL Parker Solar Probe Gateway, and the Science Operation Centers of the four science investigation teams (the University of California, Berkeley; Princeton University; Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics; and Naval Research Laboratory.) Data from Parker Solar Probe's first two orbits is also available.


Artist's concept of Parker Solar Probe approaching the Sun. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Steve Gribben

New findings from the mission's first record-setting year in space were released in the Dec. 12, 2019 issue of the journal Nature and a special issue of the Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series. Parker Solar Probe's observations reveal a complicated, active system near the Sun's surface, including a notable phenomenon called switchbacks, which are traveling disturbances in the solar wind that cause the magnetic field to bend back on itself. These switchbacks may be a major source for the heating and acceleration of the solar wind plasma.

To date, Parker Solar Probe has completed four of its planned 24 orbits around the Sun. It will eventually travel within 4 million miles of the Sun's surface, facing extreme heat and radiation. The mission seeks to provide new data on solar activity and how the solar corona works, which contributes significantly to our ability to forecast major space weather events that impact life on Earth. Parker Solar Probe launched in 2018 and will conduct its primary science mission until 2025.

By Justyna Surowiec

Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab

tnt22

https://blogs.nasa.gov/parkersolarprobe/2020/05/12/parker-solar-probe-begins-longest-science-observation-campaign/
ЦитатаParker Solar Probe Begins Longest Science Observation Campaign

Sarah Frazier
Posted May 12, 2020 at 2:31 pm


On May 9, 2020, NASA's Parker Solar Probe began its longest observation campaign to date. The spacecraft, which has already completed four progressively closer orbits around the Sun, activated its instruments at a distance of 62.5 million miles from the Sun's surface, some 39 million miles farther from the Sun than a typical solar encounter. The four instrument suites will continue to collect data through June 28, markedly longer than the mission's standard 11-day encounters.

The nearly two-month campaign is spurred by Parker Solar Probe's earlier observations, which revealed significant rotation of the solar wind and solar wind phenomena occurring much farther from the Sun than previously thought. The earlier activation of the science instruments allows the team to cover a larger range in order to trace the evolution of the solar wind as it moves away from the Sun.


Parker Solar Probe turned on its intstruments for its fifth solar flyby farther from the Sun than during previous encounters. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Steve Gribben

"We have a real opportunity here to see what's going on in these regions further from the Sun's corona," said Nour Raouafi, Parker Solar Probe project scientist at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory. "While our primary goal is to understand the mysteries at the Sun's corona and the 'young' solar wind closer to the Sun, there is evidence indicating very interesting physics to explore earlier in the orbit and link that to what occurs near the Sun. We have the capability to gather this data and see what it yields."

The spacecraft will reach its closest point to the Sun for this orbit, called perihelion, on June 7. At perihelion, Parker Solar Probe will be about 11.6 million miles from the Sun's surface, matching its own record for closest human-made object to the Sun set during its fourth orbit on Jan. 29.

After this solar encounter, the spacecraft will swoop by Venus for its first outbound flyby of the planet. This is when Parker Solar Probe will perform its third Venus gravity assist, which will allow the spacecraft to shed some of its orbital energy and get much closer to the Sun on the following orbit. Flying at an altitude of approximately 516 miles above Venus' surface -- much lower than the previous two flybys but still well above Venus' atmosphere -- Parker Solar Probe will also witness a brief 11-minute solar eclipse during the maneuver. All four instrument suites will be on and collecting data about the near-Venus environment and the planet's night side during the flyby.

Data from this fifth observation campaign will be downlinked to Earth between late June and mid-August 2020, and will be released to the public in November 2020.

By Justyna Surowiec
Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab

tnt22

Цитата: undefined Jonathan McDowell @planet4589 6 ч. назад

The Parker Solar Probe is approaching its 5th perihelion, at 0823 UTC Jun 7 (3 hours from now). It will pass 0.129AU from the Sun at a speed (relative to the Sun) of 109.2 km/s.

tnt22

https://blogs.nasa.gov/parkersolarprobe/2020/06/09/parker-solar-probe-signals-successful-fifth-encounter-of-the-sun/


ЦитатаParker Solar Probe Signals Successful Fifth Encounter of the Sun

Sarah Frazier
Posted Jun 9, 2020 at 5:19 pm


On June 9, 2020, NASA's Parker Solar Probe signaled the success of its fifth close pass by the Sun, called perihelion, with a radio beacon tone. The spacecraft completed the fifth perihelion of its mission two days prior, flying within 11.6 million miles from the Sun's surface, reaching a top speed of about 244,225 miles per hour, which matches the spacecraft's own records for closest human-made object to the Sun and fastest human-made object, set during its fourth orbit on January 29.

Mission controllers at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland, received a "status A" beacon from the spacecraft at 4:40 p.m. EDT. Status A is the best of four possible status signals, and indicates that the spacecraft is operating nominally and the instrument suites are collecting science data. This beacon tone comes after a five-day period where communications with the spacecraft were not possible.

After completing the solar encounter on June 13, Parker Solar Probe will travel toward Venus for its third flyby of the planet -- the first Venus flyby that will happen as the spacecraft travels away from the Sun, rather than towards the Sun. Parker Solar Probe will use Venus to shed some of its orbital energy and get much closer to the Sun on the following orbit. Passing at an altitude of approximately 516 miles above Venus' surface -- much lower than the previous two flybys but still well above Venus' atmosphere -- Parker Solar Probe will also witness a brief 11-minute solar eclipse during the maneuver while passing through the shadow of the planet.

Illustration of Parker Solar Probe making its fifth perihelion pass of the Sun
Parker Solar Probe made its closest approach to the Sun for its fifth orbit on June 7, 2020. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Steve Gribben

This fifth orbit around the Sun includes Parker Solar Probe's longest observation campaign to date. The spacecraft, which has already completed four progressively closer orbits, activated its instruments at a distance of 62.5 million miles from the Sun's surface on May 9, some 39 million miles farther from the Sun than a typical solar encounter. The full set of instruments will continue to collect data through June 28, markedly longer than the mission's standard 11-day encounters.

Data from this fifth observation campaign will be downlinked to Earth between late June and mid-August 2020, and will be released to the public in November 2020.

By Justyna Surowiec
Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab

tnt22

https://blogs.nasa.gov/parkersolarprobe/2020/07/10/parker-solar-probe-prepares-for-third-venus-flyby/


Цитата: undefinedParker Solar Probe Prepares for Third Venus Flyby

Sarah Frazier
Posted Jul 10, 2020 at 12:01 pm


Coming off its fifth encounter with the Sun -- and the mission's longest observation campaign yet -- Parker Solar Probe is now headed toward Venus.

Early on July 11, 2020 (UTC), the spacecraft will perform its first outbound flyby of Venus, passing approximately 516 miles above the surface as it curves around the planet. Such Venus gravity assists play an integral role in the Parker Solar Probe mission. The spacecraft relies on the planet to rid itself of orbital energy, which in turn allows it to travel ever closer to the Sun after each Venus flyby. The mission's previous two Venus flybys swooped past the Sun-facing side of the planet, and this will be Parker Solar Probe's first pass on Venus' night side.


Parker Solar Probe performs its third Venus flyby on July 11, 2020 (UTC), setting the spacecraft up for another record-breaking close approach to the Sun in September 2020. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Steve Gribben

Parker Solar Probe will witness a brief 11-minute solar eclipse during the maneuver while passing through the shadow of the planet. Utilizing powerful telescopes, the Apache Point Observatory in New Mexico, Lick Observatory in California, and the Keck Observatory in Hawaii will search for Venus aurora from the ground in coordination with Parker Solar Probe's pass around the planet, weather permitting. Scientists will combine these ground-based observations with data collected by Parker Solar Probe during the flyby to take an unprecedented look at the interactions between Venus and the solar wind.

This Venus flyby sets Parker Solar Probe up for its sixth close pass by the Sun, slated for September 27.  During this perihelion, Parker Solar Probe will travel even closer to the Sun, setting a new record when it passes approximately 8.3 million miles from the solar surface, more than 3 million miles closer than the previous perihelion at 11.6 million miles from the solar surface. The spacecraft's seventh perihelion is slated for January 17, 2021.

By Justyna Surowiec
Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab

Raul

Цитата: tnt22 от 10.07.2020 19:40:27Parker Solar Probe Prepares for Third Venus Flyby
Ну и как, пролетел он Венеру? Нигде нет никакого подтверждения, блог НАСА молчит.
Земля не может, не может не вращаться,
А мур не может, не может не мурчать!

tnt22

https://blogs.nasa.gov/parkersolarprobe/2020/09/16/parker-solar-probe-mission-releases-science-data-from-fourth-orbit/

ЦитатаParker Solar Probe Mission Releases Science Data from Fourth Orbit

Sarah Frazier
Posted Sep 16, 2020 at 11:04 am


Just over a month after Parker Solar Probe marked two action-packed years in space -- and hot on the heels of its third Venus flyby and fifth solar orbit -- the mission to "touch" the Sun released another trove of data to the public on Sept. 15.

This latest data captured by the spacecraft's four instrument suites spans Parker Solar Probe's fourth orbit around the Sun, including its first two Venus flybys, maneuvers used to bring the spacecraft's orbit in closer to the Sun.

The public can access the latest data through NASA's Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) and Solar Data Analysis Center (SDAC), the APL Parker Solar Probe Gateway, and the Science Operation Centers of the four science investigation teams (the University of California, BerkeleyPrinceton UniversityHarvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics; and Naval Research Laboratory.) Data from Parker Solar Probe's first three orbits is also available.

Two years into its journey, Parker Solar Probe has already revealed a complicated, active system swirling near the Sun's surface. The spacecraft is set to begin its sixth of 24 planned scientific encounters of the Sun in September 2020, with closest approach -- called perihelion -- on Sept. 27.

As Parker Solar Probe continues its seven-year trip around the Sun, it will eventually travel within 4 million miles of the Sun's extremely hot surface. The mission's primary goal is to provide new data on solar activity and the workings of the Sun's outer atmosphere -- the corona -- which contributes significantly to our ability to forecast major space weather events that impact life on Earth.

By Justyna Surowiec

Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab

tnt22

https://blogs.nasa.gov/parkersolarprobe/2020/09/25/parker-solar-probe-speeds-toward-record-setting-close-approach-to-the-sun/

ЦитатаParker Solar Probe Speeds toward Record-Setting Close Approach to the Sun

Sarah Frazier
Posted Sep 25, 2020 at 4:34 pm


Propelled by a midsummer flyby of Venus, NASA's Parker Solar Probe has started yet another record-setting, science-gathering swing around the Sun, its sixth flyby of our star.

Some instruments on the spacecraft have been turned on since late August, collecting data on the near-Sun environment and the solar wind as it streams from our star. At closest approach (called perihelion) on Sept. 27, Parker Solar Probe will come within about 8.4 million miles (13.5 million kilometers) of the Sun's surface while moving 289,927 miles per hour (466,592 kilometers per hour) -- shattering its own records[/font] on both counts.

This also marks the first time Parker Solar Probe will dip to within 0.1 astronomical units of the Sun's center; an "AU" is 93 million miles, the average distance between Earth and the Sun.

"After our last orbit -- during which we started science operations much farther out than this encounter -- we're returning our focus to the solar wind closer to the Sun," said Nour Raouafi, Parker Solar Probe project scientist at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland. "We always wonder if we'll see something new as we get closer and closer. And as the solar cycle rises and the Sun becomes more active, we'll be able to observe that activity from an unprecedented vantage point."

Two years into its journey, Parker Solar Probe remains healthy and operating normally. As it continues its seven-year mission, the spacecraft will eventually travel within 4 million miles of the Sun's extremely hot surface. The mission's primary goal is to provide new data on solar activity and the workings of the Sun's outer atmosphere -- the corona -- which contributes significantly to our ability to forecast major space weather events that impact life on Earth.

This weekend's perihelion was set up by the probe's third Venus flyby. On July 11, the spacecraft came within 518 miles above Venus' surface -- much lower than the previous two flybys but still well above Venus' atmosphere -- putting it on a path that brings it 3.25 million miles closer to the Sun than the last perihelion, on June 7. Mission Design and Navigation Manager Yanping Guo of APL noted that the gravity assist provided the mission's largest orbital speed reduction since launch, trimming the spacecraft's velocity by 8,438 miles per hour (13,579 kilometers per hour).

Related: Watch how data travels from Parker Solar Probe to Earth.

By Mike Buckley

Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab
[/b]

tnt22

ЦитатаHow Data Gets from the Sun to the Scientists | Parker Solar Probe

 JHU Applied Physics Laboratory

12 авг. 2020 г.

Two years ago, the Parker Solar Probe embarked on a historical journey. Since then, the mission has been changing the landscape of heliophysics.

Parker Solar Probe will swoop to within 4 million miles of the Sun's surface, facing heat and radiation like no spacecraft before it. At closest approach, Parker Solar Probe will be hurtling around the Sun at approximately 430,000 miles per hour! That's fast enough to get from Philadelphia to Washington, D.C., in one second. So how does the Parker Solar Probe get information from the Sun to the scientists? It takes some careful timing and aiming.

youtu.be/jeMMr8Wmw0I

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jeMMr8Wmw0I (3:26)

tnt22

https://blogs.nasa.gov/parkersolarprobe/2020/09/30/parker-solar-probe-phones-home-after-sixth-sun-flyby/

ЦитатаParker Solar Probe 'Phones Home' After Sixth Sun Flyby

Sarah Frazier
Posted Sep 30, 2020 at 2:32 pm


Zooming away from the Sun, NASA's Parker Solar Probe checked in with its operators on Earth early on Sept. 30, 2020, letting them know it's healthy and operating normally after another record-setting close approach to our star on Sept. 27.

Flight controllers at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland, received a "Status A" signal from the spacecraft through NASA's Deep Space Network at 4:45 a.m. EDT; Status A is the best of four possible status signals, and indicates that the spacecraft is operating nominally.


Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Steve Gribben

The beacon comes after a six-day stretch when communications with the spacecraft were not possible as it wheeled around the Sun. This is the first sign of a successful solar encounter; this sixth solar encounter began Sept. 21 and continues through Oct. 2.

At closest approach (called perihelion) on Sept. 27, Parker Solar Probe came within about 8.4 million miles (13.5 million kilometers) of the Sun's surface -- less than one-tenth of the distance between Earth and the Sun -- while reaching a top speed of 289,927 miles per hour (466,592 kilometers per hour), breaking its own records for speed and solar distance.

The team will begin downlinking data from this solar encounter on Oct. 3, giving it more information about the spacecraft's condition and performance of the science instruments during the flyby.

By Mike Buckley

Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab

tnt22

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2020/two-views-of-a-sungrazing-comet

ЦитатаOct. 28, 2020

Two Views of a Sungrazing Comet


This series of images from the WISPR instrument on board Parker Solar Probe shows a small sungrazing comet, SOHO-4063, as it approached the Sun on Sept. 13-14, 2020. This is the first observation of a sungrazing comet by Parker Solar Probe's instruments.
Credits: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Naval Research Lab/Parker Solar Probe/Guillermo Stenborg


When scientists downlinked data from Parker Solar Probe's sixth orbit, there was a small, bright surprise waiting for them: the spacecraft's first observation of a sungrazing comet. This particular comet was discovered just weeks earlier using data from ESA (European Space Agency) and NASA's Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, or SOHO.

Parker Solar Probe captured spectacular images of comet NEOWISE in July 2020, but this is the first time the spacecraft has seen a sungrazer -- a particular class of comet that flies extremely close to the Sun, typically so small and dim that they are impossible to see from Earth or observatories other than SOHO. This sighting confirms the hope of the Parker Solar Probe team that the spacecraft's WISPR instrument, designed to image the Sun's outer atmosphere and solar wind, could provide new insight into these star-skimming celestial bodies.

Like nearly all sungrazers, this comet -- nicknamed SOHO-4063 after the observatory that first spotted it -- was destroyed as it swooped by the Sun, disintegrated by heating from the intense sunlight. It's this destruction process that scientists hope to learn more about with future Parker Solar Probe observations of sungrazers -- a prospect that looks more likely based on these first images. The comet appeared brighter in Parker Solar Probe's data than in that from SOHO, indicating that Parker Solar Probe's WISPR instrument is particularly sensitive to comets and may provide a new level of detail on the sungrazers that happen to cross its field of view. Parker Solar Probe's close solar orbit also puts the spacecraft closer to these sungrazing comets than other observatories -- about 40 million miles away, less than half the distance from which SOHO sees sungrazers.

youtu.be/yOyqdrvAM-k
These images from Sept. 13-15, 2020, show comet SOHO-4063 as it approaches the Sun, seen by ESA (European Space Agency) and NASA's Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. Comet SOHO-4063 was later detected in data from NASA's Parker Solar Probe.
Credits: ESA/NASA/SOHO/Naval Research Lab/Brendan Gallagher


Comet SOHO-4063 was originally discovered on Sept. 13, 2020, by citizen scientist Worachate Boonplod with the Sungrazer Project, and the comet first appeared in Parker Solar Probe's data later on Sept. 13. Parker Solar Probe sends its science data back to Earth in batches at certain points in its orbit, meaning scientists didn't have a chance to look for this comet in Parker Solar Probe's data until weeks after it was initially discovered in SOHO's data. Even with such weeks- or months-long lags, Parker Solar Probe's proximity to sungrazers and the WISPR instrument's high sensitivity to comets means that Parker Solar Probe may eventually spot new sungrazing comets that elude even SOHO.  


Last Updated: Oct. 28, 2020
Editor: Sarah Frazier

tnt22

https://blogs.nasa.gov/parkersolarprobe/2020/11/17/data-from-parker-solar-probes-fifth-orbit-now-available/

ЦитатаData from Parker Solar Probe's Fifth Orbit Now Available

Sarah Frazier
Posted Nov 17, 2020 at 1:04 pm

Data from Parker Solar Probe's fifth orbit around the Sun is now available to the public.

This latest batch of science data was collected by Parker Solar Probe's four instrument suites this past summer, and covers the mission's fifth solar encounter -- including closest approach to the Sun, called perihelion, on June 7-- and a special observation period for the mission's third Venus flyby in July.

The data can be accessed through NASA's Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) and Solar Data Analysis Center (SDAC), the APL Parker Solar Probe Gateway, and the Science Operation Centers of the four science investigation teams (the University of California, BerkeleyPrinceton UniversityHarvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics; and the Naval Research Laboratory).


Parker Solar Probe made its closest approach to the Sun for its fifth orbit on June 7, 2020. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Steve Gribben

In September, Parker Solar Probe completed its sixth solar encounter. Data from this sixth encounter will be released in February 2021, and early review by the science team has already revealed the mission's first observation of a sungrazing comet.

Next year will be record-setting for Parker Solar Probe. Starting in January, the spacecraft, built and operated by the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland, will embark on four solar encounters and two Venus flybys throughout 2021. The spacecraft will travel even closer toward the Sun's blazing atmosphere, capturing unprecedented data on solar activity and breaking its own speed and distance records multiple times in the process. 

Parker Solar Probe's next solar encounter -- on Jan. 12-23, 2021 -- will carry the spacecraft around the Earth-facing side of the Sun, providing an opportunity for joint observations with multiple ground-based observatories and several space missions. The coordinated observation campaign organized by the mission's science team will include NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory and STEREO spacecraft, ESA's BepiColombo, and ESA and NASA's Solar Orbiter and SOHO missions.

By Justyna Surowiec 
Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab