Dragon SpX-19 (CRS-19), HISUI, +... - Falcon 9-077 (B1059.1) - CCAFS SLC-40 - 05.12.2019, 17:29 UTC

Автор tnt22, 23.10.2019 19:40:28

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tnt22

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/experience-the-launch-of-the-spacex-crs-19-mission
ЦитатаOct. 22, 2019

Experience the Launch of the SpaceX CRS-19 Mission

Social media users are invited to register to attend the launch of the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying the Dragon spacecraft from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in Florida. This launch, currently targeted for Wednesday, Dec. 4, will be the next commercial cargo resupply services mission to the International Space Station.

If your passion is to communicate and engage the world via social media, then this is the event for you! Seize the opportunity to be on the front line to blog, tweet or Instagram everything about SpaceX's 19th resupply mission. In addition to supplies and equipment, the Dragon spacecraft will deliver several science investigations to the station.

...

Last Updated: Oct. 23, 2019
Editor: Andres Almeida

tnt22

https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-invites-media-to-next-spacex-space-station-cargo-launch
ЦитатаOct. 23, 2019
MEDIA ADVISORY M19-117

NASA Invites Media to Next SpaceX Space Station Cargo Launch


A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida at 6:01 p.m. EDT on July 25, 2019, carrying the Dragon spacecraft on the company's 18th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station.
Credits: NASA/Tony Gray & Kenny Allen


Media accreditation is open for the launch of the next SpaceX delivery of science investigations, supplies, and equipment to the International Space Station.

A SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft is scheduled to launch on a Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in Florida no earlier than Wednesday, Dec. 4 at 12:48 p.m. EST.

Media prelaunch and launch activities will take place at NASA's Kennedy Space Center and neighboring CCAFS.

...

Each resupply mission to the station delivers scientific investigations in the areas of biology and biotechnology, physical sciences, Earth and space science. Advances in these areas will help to keep astronauts healthy during long-duration space travel and demonstrate technologies for future human and robotic exploration beyond low-Earth orbit to the Moon and Mars. Space station research through the ISS National Lab also provides opportunities for other U.S. government agencies, private industry, and academic and research institutions, to conduct microgravity research that leads to new technologies, medical treatments, and products that improve life on Earth.

Highlights of space station research that will be facilitated by research aboard this SpaceX Dragon mission include testing the effectiveness of a device to separate and capture water droplets suspended in an air stream, delivering a next-generation spaceborne system to image Earth in higher spectral resolution than currently possible onboard the TERRA satellite, and testing conditions to develop an inexpensive and scalable process to manufacture optical materials in space.

Cargo resupply from U.S. companies ensures a national capability to deliver critical science research to the space station, significantly increasing NASA's ability to conduct new investigations at the only laboratory in space. This is the 19th SpaceX mission under NASA's Commercial Resupply Services contract.

The International Space Station is a convergence of science, technology and human innovation that demonstrates new technologies and enables research not possible on Earth. The space station has been occupied continuously since November 2000. In that time, 239 people and a variety of international and commercial spacecraft have visited the orbiting laboratory. The space station remains the springboard to NASA's next great leap in exploration, including future missions to the Moon and eventually to Mars.

For launch countdown coverage, NASA's launch blog, and more information about the mission, visit:


-end-

Last Updated: Oct. 23, 2019
Editor: Karen Northon

tnt22


tnt22

https://www.nasa.gov/content/upcoming-elana-cubesat-launches
ЦитатаUpcoming ELaNa CubeSat Launches

ELaNa 25B
Date:  December 4, 2019
Mission:  Space X-19 - Falcon 9, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL
3 CubeSat Missions scheduled to be deployed
    [/li]
  • AzTechSat-1 - NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California
  • SORTIE - Atmospheric & Space Technology Research Associates, Boulder, Colorado
  • CryoCube - NASA Kennedy Space Center, Merritt Island, Florida​
ELaNa 28
Date:  December 4, 2019
Mission:  SpaceX-19 - Falcon 9, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL
2 CubeSat Missions scheduled to be deployed
    [/li]
  • CIRiS - Utah State University, Logan, Utah
  • EdgeCube - Sonoma State University, Rohnert Park, California

tnt22

Цитата von Karman Institute‏ @vki_vonkarman 9 окт.

Next stop: #Space! Last week, #QARMAN #CubeSat was integrated into its deployer at @Nanoracks facilities in Houston.  The #deployers of QARMAN and co-passagengers will now be integrated into the Dragon #spacecraft, for a Falcon9 launch towards the #ISS on December 4th.



tnt22

https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/news/spx19-research
ЦитатаNov. 20, 2019

Research Launching on SpaceX Dragon to Enable Better Earth Images, Easier Leak Checks

The 19th SpaceX Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-19) contract mission for NASA carries a variety of cutting-edge scientific experiments to the International Space Station. The Dragon cargo spacecraft blasts off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on a Falcon 9 rocket no earlier than Dec. 4, 2019. Its payloads include investigations studying malting barley in microgravity, the spread of fire and bone and muscle loss, which will be added to the dozens of research projects already under way aboard the microgravity lab. The space station, entering its 20th year of continuous human presence, provides opportunities for research by government agencies, private industry, and academic and research institutions. Such research supports Artemis, NASA's missions to the Moon and Mars, and leads to new technologies, medical treatments and products that improve life on Earth.

Read more about some of the scientific investigations riding on Dragon to the orbiting laboratory on CRS-19.

A Better Picture of Earth's Surface

The Japanese Space Agency (JAXA) Hyperspectral Imager Suite (HISUI) is a next-generation, hyperspectral Earth imaging system. Hyperspectral imaging has high resolution across all colors of the light spectrum, providing more information about the characteristics and physical properties of a target. Every material on the Earth's surface - soil, rocks, vegetation, snow, ice and human-made objects - reflects a unique spectrum of light, making it possible to identify specific materials in an image.


This image of the Chapman Glacier, located on Ellesmere Island in Canada, was taken by ASTER. Formed by the merger of several smaller glaciers, rocky debris on top of the glacier clearly marks the edge of each glacier. The JAXA Hyperspectral Imager Suite (HISUI) is a follow-on to ASTER, serving as a next-generation, space-borne hyperspectral Earth imaging system.
Credits: NASA/METI/AIST/Japan Space Systems, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team


HISUI provides in-flight performance verification of the system and its acquisition of data, as well as its usefulness for various tasks such as resource exploration and applications in agriculture, forestry and other environmental areas. This investigation is a follow-on to the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's TERRA satellite.

Malting Barley in Microgravity


Barley germinating on the International Space Station as part of Budweiser's experiment, Barley Germination, which launched on SpaceX CRS-13.
Credits: Space Tango


Barley contains antioxidants, vitamins and minerals. Malting converts starches from the raw grain into various sugars suitable for use in brewing, distilling and food production. Understanding how barley responds to microgravity could identify ways to adapt it for nutritional use on long-duration spaceflights. Malting ABI Voyager Barley Seeds in Microgravity tests an automated malting procedure and compares malt produced in space and on the ground for genetic and structural changes.

Communicating Satellite to Satellite


The AzTechSat-1, a CubeSat soon on its way to the space station to demonstrate communication with the Globalstar Constellation satellite network, during its final hardware integration.
Credits: Andres Martinez, NASA Ames


The AztechSat-1 investigation demonstrates communication between a CubeSat and the GlobalStar Constellation satellite network in low-Earth orbit. Such communication could reduce the need for ground stations, lowering the cost and increasing the number of data downloads possible for satellite applications. Inter-satellite communication is critical to future human space exploration. Its reduced cost and increased data capability also could improve many satellite-based services used by people on Earth. The CubeSat will be deployed from the International Space Station's Japanese Experiment Module airlock. This is the first CubeSat built by students in Mexico that will launch from the space station.

The Spread of Fire


Preflight imagery of Confined Combustion in the MSG Ground Integration Unit. Confined Combustion examines the behavior of flame as it spreads in differently-shaped confined spaces in microgravity.
Credits: Chris Rogers


Understanding how fire spreads and behaves in space is crucial for the safety of future astronauts and for understanding and controlling fire here on Earth. The Confined Combustion investigation examines the behavior of flame as it spreads in differently-shaped confined spaces in microgravity. More specifically, it will look at the interactions between spreading flames and surrounding walls. The spread of flames in confined spaces (such as buildings and vehicles) may pose a more serious fire hazard than flame spread in open spaces because of acceleration caused by heat radiating back from the surrounding walls. Studying flames in microgravity gives researchers a better look at the underlying physics and basic principles of combustion by removing gravity from the equation.

Keeping Bones and Muscles Strong

The goal of Rodent Research-19 (RR-19) is to investigate a proposed method of preventing bone and muscle loss. The human body evolved within the constant pull of Earth's gravity. Astronauts have to exercise for multiple hours every day to prevent bone and muscle atrophy during their stays in space. Bone and muscle atrophy also occurs during normal aging, due to a sedentary lifestyle and during illnesses. RR-19 investigates myostatin (MSTN) and activin, molecular signaling pathways that influence muscle degradation, as possible targets for preventing muscle and bone loss during spaceflight and enhancing recovery following return to Earth. This study also could support the development of therapies for a wide range of conditions that cause muscle and bone loss on Earth.

Checking for Leaks


The Robotics Tool Stowage (RiTS) undergoes testing in the Neutral Buoyancy Lab at the Johnson Space Center. The RiTS will allow for the Robotic External Leak Locator to be stored outside the space station, eliminating crew time needed to transport it into space.
Credits: NASA


Nobody wants a spacecraft to spring a leak - but if it happens, the best thing you can do is locate and fix it, fast. That is why NASA launched the Robotic External Leak Locator (RELL) in 2015, and a second RELL in April 2019. Operators can use these tools with the Dextre robot to quickly detect leaks outside of station and help engineers formulate a plan to resolve an issue. On CRS-19, NASA is now launching the Robotic Tool Stowage (RiTS), a docking station that allows the RELL units to be stored on the outside of space station, making it quicker and simpler to deploy the instruments. Outside storage eliminates the need to rely on crew member and airlock availability to move a unit to the outside. These capabilities can be applied to any place that humans live in space, including Gateway and eventually habitats on the Moon, Mars and beyond.

Measuring Gravity From Space

CRS-19 carries upgrades for the Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL), a multi-use facility that produces clouds of atoms chilled to temperatures much colder than deep space. Atoms have almost no motion at such low temperatures, making it possible to study fundamental behaviors and quantum characteristics that are difficult or impossible to probe at higher temperatures. Microgravity may allow for cooling to even colder temperatures than on the ground, and also allows researchers to observe atom clouds for longer periods of time. The new package launching on CRS-19 will include hardware that will allow scientists to make subtle measurements of gravity. This could enable scientists to probe fundamental theories of gravity and lead to the development of improved sensors that can be used for spacecraft navigation and to study Earth's climate.

These are just a few of the many investigations currently being conducted aboard the orbiting laboratory.

Melissa Gaskill

International Space Station Program Science Office
Johnson Space Center


Last Updated: Nov. 20, 2019
Editor: Michael Johnson

tnt22

Зона затопления 2-й ст РН (хм-м-м, несколько необычная...)

NOTAM
ЦитатаYMMM

F3438/19 - ROCKET LAUNCH WILL TAKE PLACE
FLW RECEIVED FROM GOVERNMENT OF UNITED STATES OF AMERICA:
HAZARDOUS OPS WILL BE CONDUCTED FOR ATMOSPHERIC RE-ENTRY AND SPLASHDOWN OF LAUNCH VEHICLE UPPER STAGE FALCON9 CRS19 WI THE FOLLOWING AREA:
58 52S 050 29E
55 59S 052 23E
55 26S 059 28E
54 58S 065 18E
54 08S 073 22E
52 46S 083 57E
51 25S 091 09E
49 01S 100 13E
46 34S 108 49E
44 49S 113 54E
46 47S 116 19E
52 02S 109 55E
52 57S 108 32E
56 09S 102 10E
59 05S 092 54E
61 08S 081 09E
61 48S 071 27E
61 08S 060 26E TO BEGINNING.
SFC - UNL, PRI RE-ENTRY 042302-042344 BACKUP RE-ENTRY 052240-052322,
04 DEC 23:02 2019 UNTIL 05 DEC 23:22 2019.
CREATED: 23 NOV 20:36 2019

Pirat5

25.11.2019 09:14:23 #8 Последнее редактирование: 25.11.2019 09:15:46 от Pirat5
https://www.reddit.com/r/spacex/comments/e0upb3/
много неизвестного.
SF сегодня в ночь (предположительно)
ЦитатаStar✦Fleet Tours‏ @StarFleetTours
Our sources indicate SpaceX CRS-19 static fire is currently targeted for late Monday Nov. 25 (in EST). Once the booster is rolled out, we'll be able to see if has recovery hardware, and hopefully get a statement from SpaceX about the landing. Stay tuned!


tnt22

К #9
ЦитатаChris B - NSF‏ @NASASpaceflight 2 ч.2 часа назад

Cape-wide notice has the Falcon 9 Static Fire window (SLC-40) as NET (No Earlier Than) Monday night through to the early hours of Tuesday, local time.

This is in support of the CRS-19 launch to the ISS on December 4.

tnt22

Цитата Chris B - NSF‏ @NASASpaceflight 2 ч. назад

Tonight's Cape Support for the CRS-19 Static Fire window has been stood down with no new date. So no Static Fire tonight, basically.

tnt22

https://spaceflightnow.com/2019/11/25/after-quiet-autumn-spacex-preps-for-busy-december-launch-schedule/
ЦитатаAfter quiet autumn, SpaceX preps for busy December launch schedule
November 25, 2019 | Stephen Clark


File photo of a Falcon 9 launch from Cape Canaveral's Complex 40 launch pad. Credit: SpaceX

After a lull in launch activity this fall, SpaceX teams at Cape Canaveral are preparing for up to four Falcon 9 missions in December to close out 2019 with a surge of launches.

SpaceX has launched just one Falcon 9 rocket since Aug. 6, but the company's launch cadence is set to return to its normally brisk pace beginning Dec. 4 with the planned liftoff of a Dragon resupply mission to the International Space Station.

Launch teams at Cape Canaveral's Complex 40 launch pad are readying a Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon cargo capsule for the journey to the space station. Launch on Dec. 4 is scheduled for 12:51 p.m. EST (1751 GMT), roughly the moment when the Earth's rotation brings Florida's Space Coast under the space station's ground track.

The Falcon 9's first stage is expected to attempt a landing on SpaceX's drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean after the Dec. 4 launch.

The Dragon supply ship will deliver several tons of equipment to the station, including more than a ton of specimens and hardware for scientific experiments, such as an investigation into flame behavior in microgravity, and 40 mice scientists are launching for a study of muscular degradation during spaceflight.

Assuming an on-time launch Dec. 4, the logistics mission will arrive at the station Dec. 7 and return to Earth with cargo in early January for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean.

The cargo mission will be the SpaceX's 19th Dragon resupply flight since the company began operational deliveries to the station in October 2012.

Resupply missions under SpaceX's current $3 billion Commercial Resupply Services contract with NASA will end with the 20th cargo flight in March.  ...

tnt22

Цитата Spaceflight Now‏ @SpaceflightNow 4 мин. назад

SpaceX has raised a Falcon 9 rocket vertical at Cape Canaveral's Complex 40 launch pad in preparation for a hold-down test-firing later today. The rocket is set for launch Dec. 4 on a resupply flight to the International Space Station. LIVE UPDATES: https://spaceflightnow.com/2019/11/26/falcon-9-crs-19-launch-preps/ ...


tnt22

26.11.2019 18:14:46 #13 Последнее редактирование: 26.11.2019 18:15:16 от tnt22
https://spaceflightnow.com/2019/11/26/falcon-9-crs-19-launch-preps/
Цитата11/26/2019 18:03 Stephen Clark

SpaceX plans a test-firing of its next Falcon 9 rocket Tuesday at Cape Canaveral's Complex 40 launch pad. The Falcon 9 is set to launch Dec. 4 with a Dragon supply ship heading for the International Space Station.

Ground teams raised the Falcon 9 vertical in its starting block at pad 40 Tuesday morning. The rocket is not fitted with the Dragon supply ship it will launch toward the space station.

The Falcon 9's nine Merlin first stage engines will ignite for several seconds later today in a hold-down test-firing. Restraints at the launch pad will keep the Falcon 9 firmly on the ground.

Launch on Dec. 4 is scheduled for 12:51 p.m. EST (1751 GMT), roughly the moment when the Earth's rotation brings Florida's Space Coast under the space station's ground track.

The Falcon 9's first stage is expected to attempt a landing on SpaceX's drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean after the Dec. 4 launch.

The Dragon supply ship will deliver several tons of equipment to the station, including more than a ton of specimens and hardware for scientific experiments, such as an investigation into flame behavior in microgravity, and 40 mice scientists are launching for a study of muscular degradation during spaceflight.

Assuming an on-time launch Dec. 4, the logistics mission will arrive at the station Dec. 7 and return to Earth with cargo in early January for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean.

The cargo mission will be the SpaceX's 19th Dragon resupply flight since the company began operational deliveries to the station in October 2012.

tnt22

Цитата Michael Baylor‏ @nextspaceflight 18 мин. назад

The CRS-19 mission will use a new first stage, B1059-1. B1056-3, originally penciled in for CRS-19, is now expected to be used for JCSAT, but core assignments are always subject to change. #SpaceX

tnt22

Цитата11/26/2019 23:41 Spaceflight Now

The first wisps of vapor at Launch Complex 40 are an indication that SpaceX is readying the Falcon 9 for a static test firing of its Merlin first stage engines later today.


tnt22

Цитата11/27/2019 01:12 Stephen Clark

Vapors are now streaming away from the Falcon 9 rocket at the Complex 40 launch pad, suggesting fueling is well underway and the static fire test is on track for 5:30 p.m. EST (2230 GMT).

tnt22


tnt22

Цитата11/27/2019 01:27 Stephen Clark

The strongback umbilical tower at Complex 40 is retracting into position for engine start, suggesting the hold-down firing of the Falcon 9 rocket's nine first stage Merlin engines remains on track for 5:30 p.m. EST (2230 GMT).

This firing will last several seconds as the rocket ramps up to 1.7 million pounds of thrust, while hold-down restraints keep the Falcon 9 on the ground.

tnt22