AEHF-5 - Atlas V 551 (AV-084) - CCAFS SLC-41 - 08.08.2019, 10:13 UTC

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https://www.ulalaunch.com/missions/atlas-v-aehf-5

ЦитатаATLAS V TO LAUNCH AEHF-5



• Rocket: Atlas V 551
• Mission: Fifth Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF-5)
• Launch Date: June 2019
• Launch Time: To be announced
• Launch Broadcast: To be announced
• Launch Location: Space Launch Complex-41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

Mission Information: United Launch Alliance will use an Atlas V 551 rocket to launch the fifth communications satellite in the Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) series for the U.S. Air Force. AEHF satellites provide highly-secure, jam-proof connectivity between U.S. national leadership and deployed military forces. Atlas V rockets successfully launched the first four AEHF satellites in 2010, 2012, 2013 and 2018.

Launch Notes: The AEHF-5 launch will mark the 80th Atlas V mission since the inaugural launch in 2002 and the 10th in the 551 configuration.

Go Atlas! Go Centaur! Go AEHF-5

tnt22

https://www.ulalaunch.com/missions/atlas-v-aehf-5
ЦитатаApr 22, 2019 18:37

Next Atlas V arrives at the launch site from the factory

April 22, 2019 -- United Launch Alliance's sea-faring cargo vessel has delivered the Atlas V rocket to the Cape Canaveral launch site from our manufacturing facility in preparation for boosting a U.S. national security asset into space this summer.


Mariner arrived at Port Canaveral on Easter Sunday. Photo: United Launch Alliance

The Mariner ship set sail April 13 from the ULA's factory in Decatur, Alabama, for the trek to Florida's east-central coast carrying the Atlas V common core booster first stage and the Centaur upper stage that will perform ULA's next mission for the U.S. Air Force.

After docking at Port Canaveral over the weekend, crews offloaded the stages this morning. The first stage was driven to the Atlas Spaceflight Operations Center (ASOC) to undergo receiving checks and preparatory steps for its upcoming vertical stacking to launch. The Centaur, meanwhile, will be integrated to the interstage adapter and lower portion of the payload fairing in the coming weeks.


The Atlas V first stage rolls off the Mariner. Photo: United Launch Alliance

The rocket, designated AV-083, will launch the fifth Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF-5) satellite into orbit to relay secure, jam-resistent communications for strategic and tactical warfighters.

ULA has used Atlas V rockets to successfully deliver the four previous AEHF satellites into space for the Air Force. The launch of AEHF-5 is targeted for June 2019.

This will be the 80th flight of the Atlas V rocket and the 10th in the powerful 551 configuration with five side-mounted solid-fuel boosters for maximum takeoff thrust.


The Centaur upper stage will power AEHF-5 to its prescribed orbit. Photo: United Launch Alliance

tnt22

ЦитатаJames Dean‏Подлинная учетная запись @flatoday_jdean 1 ч. назад

Air Force says 5th Advanced Extremely High Frequency satellite (#AEHF5) was delivered to Cape Canaveral on April 20. Launch on ULA Atlas V targeted for June 27.

tnt22

26.04.2019 19:11:52 #3 Последнее редактирование: 28.04.2019 08:21:31 от tnt22
https://spaceflightnow.com/2019/04/26/atlas-5-rocket-u-s-air-force-satellite-arrive-at-cape-canaveral-for-june-launch/
ЦитатаAtlas 5 rocket, U.S. Air Force satellite arrive at Cape Canaveral for June launch
April 26, 2019Stephen Clark


The first stage of ULA's Atlas 5 rocket is unloaded from the Mariner transport ship after arriving at Cape Canaveral on April 21. Credit: United Launch Alliance

Atlas 5 rocket hardware and a U.S. Air Force communications satellite have arrived at Cape Canaveral for United Launch Alliance's next mission, scheduled for liftoff June 27.

The equipment arrived at the Florida spaceport last weekend on separate shipments aboard an Air Force C-5 cargo plane and ULA's Mariner transport vessel.

The Air Force's fifth Advanced Extremely High Frequency communications satellite rode a C-5 airlifter from Lockheed Martin's factory in Sunnyvale, California, and arrived at Cape Canaveral on April 20. The rocket-carrying Mariner transport ship arrived at Port Canaveral on April 21 after a trip from ULA's manufacturing plant in Decatur, Alabama, delivering the first and second stages of AEHF 5's Atlas 5 launcher.

Teams will spend the next couple of months readying AEHF 5 and the Atlas 5 rocket for liftoff June 27 from Cape Canaveral's Complex 41 launch pad. The mission will mark the 80th flight of an Atlas 5 rocket since 2002, and the first Atlas 5 launch of the year.

The Atlas 5, designated AV-083, will launch in its most powerful variant with five strap-on solid rocket boosters built by Aerojet Rocketdyne and a 5-meter-diameter (17.7-foot) payload fairing made by Ruag Space, a configuration known as the Atlas 5-551 that has flown nine times before. The five solid-fueled motors will provide an extra boost to the Atlas 5's first stage, powered by a Russian-made RD-181 main engine that burns kerosene and liquid oxygen propellants.

The combined power of the boosters and main engine will give the Atlas 5 around 2.6 million pounds of thrust at liftoff.

Workers unloaded the Atlas 5's first stage and Centaur upper stage, powered by an Aerojet Rocketdyne RL10 engine, from the Mariner transport ship Monday. ULA teams transferred the first stage to the Atlas Space Operations Center for checkouts before it is stacked vertically on the mobile launch platform at the Complex 41 launch pad. The Centaur upper stage will be be integrated with an interstage adapter and the lower part of the Atlas 5's payload shroud in the coming weeks, according to ULA.

Ground crews will hoist the Atlas 5 first stage, five solid rocket boosters and the Centaur upper stage on the mobile launch table inside the Vertical Integration Facility at Complex 41. Working in a nearby clean room, technicians will fuel the AEHF 5 satellite and encapsulate the spacecraft inside the Atlas 5's nose cone before raising the payload atop the launcher inside the VIF.
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ULA's Mariner transport ship carries rocket hardware from the company's factory in Decatur, Alabama, to launch sites in Florida and California. Credit: United Launch Alliance

The launch of AEHF 5 follows Atlas 5 missions that deployed four previous AEHF satellites in 2010, 2012, 2013 and 2018.

The AEHF satellites provide secure communications services to the U.S. military, working together in a network the Air Force says is resilient to jamming, cyber attacks, and even nuclear war. The AEHF spacecraft are positioned in geostationary orbit more than 22,000 miles (nearly 36,000 kilometers) over the equator, using a cross-linked architecture allowing the satellites to relay signals between one another without transmitting to ground stations.

The spacecraft are built by Lockheed Martin, with communications payloads produced by Northrop Grumman.


Artist's concept of an AEHF satellite in orbit. Credit: U.S. Air Force/Lockheed Martin

"The payload supports communication missions with increased coverage, capacity, and protections against electronic jamming which gives our warfighters the best advantage against our adversaries," said Brig. Gen. Steve Whitney, program executive officer for the Space Production Corps.

The AEHF network is also used by Canada, the United Kingdom and the Netherlands, and replaces the Air Force's aging Milstar constellation.

tnt22

https://www.ulalaunch.com/missions/atlas-v-aehf-5
ЦитатаMay 18, 2019 17:57
Next Atlas V rocket goes vertical for launch

May 18, 2019 -- United Launch Alliance has begun stacking the Atlas V rocket for its summer mission to carry a national security satellite into space for the U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center.


The Atlas booster stage arrives at VIF just after sunrise today. Photo: United Launch Alliance

On Friday, May 17, the Atlas V first stage was hoisted aboard the mobile launch platform (MLP) at the Vertical Integration Facility (VIF) adjacent to Space Launch Complex-41 at the Cape to launch the fifth Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF-5) protected communications satellite in June.

The event is known as LVOS, or Launch Vehicle on Stand, and signifies the start of final pre-flight processing of a rocket for its flight into space.

This was the 65th Atlas V to undergo LVOS at Cape Canaveral.


Cranes rotate the stage upright. Photo: United Launch Alliance

The operation began with the stage being driven to the VIF from the Atlas Spaceflight Operations Center (ASOC), which housed the Atlas since it arrived from the factory a month ago. Cranes carefully picked up the 107-foot-long stage, turned it upright and then maneuvered the rocket through the VIF doorway to the waiting MLP.

The Atlas V first stage will hold the 25,000 gallons of RP-1 kerosene fuel and 49,000 gallons of liquid oxygen to feed the RD-180 main engine during the initial four-and-a-half minutes of the rocket's ascent.

The coming weeks will see the five solid rocket boosters (SRBs) brought to the VIF one-by-one and attached to the sides of the first stage, the Centaur upper stage will be hoisted atop the rocket and then the AEHF-5 spacecraft payload gets mounted on the Atlas V.
 

The first stage to launch AEHF-5 is hoisted onto the MLP. Photo: United Launch Alliance

The fully-assembled, 197-foot-tall rocket will be transfered aboard the MLP the one-third-of-a-mile from the VIF to the launch pad for the countdown and liftoff.

Launch of the AEHF-5 satellite remains targeted for June 27.

The AEHF system, developed by Lockheed Martin, provides vastly improved global, survivable, protected communications capabilities for strategic command and tactical warfighters.

tnt22

https://spaceflightnow.com/2019/05/20/ula-begins-stacking-atlas-5-rocket-for-late-june-launch/
ЦитатаULA begins stacking Atlas 5 rocket for late June launch
May 20, 2019Stephen Clark


The first stage of ULA's Atlas 5 rocket arrives at Cape Canaveral's Complex 41 launch pad Friday. Credit: United Launch Alliance

The bronze first stage of United Launch Alliance's next Atlas 5 rocket arrived at its Cape Canaveral launch pad Friday, where it will be joined by five solid-fueled boosters, a Centaur upper stage and a U.S. Air Force communications satellite in the coming weeks ahead of liftoff set for June 27.

Riding on a specially-outfitted trailer, the rocket's first stage was trucked fr om the Atlas Space Operations Center at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station to the nearby Complex 41 launch pad, wh ere cranes lifted the 107-foot-long (32-meter) stage vertical and placed it on a mobile platform inside the Vertical Integration Facility.

ULA workers will next install five strap-on solid rocket boosters, manufactured by Aerojet Rocketdyne, around the base of the Atlas 5's first stage. A Centaur upper stage will be hoisted atop the Atlas 5, and the rocket's build-up at Cape Canaveral will be capped with the addition of the Air Force's fifth Advanced Extremely High Frequency communications satellite next month.

The AEHF 5 satellite will be the sole payload on the Atlas 5 rocket when it lifts off from Florida's Space Coast.

The launch is scheduled for June 27 during a two-hour window that opens at 6 a.m. EDT (1000 GMT).

The Atlas 5, designated AV-083, will launch in its most powerful variant with five strap-on solid rocket boosters built by Aerojet Rocketdyne and a 5-meter-diameter (17.7-foot) payload fairing made by Ruag Space, a configuration known as the Atlas 5-551 that has flown nine times before. The five solid-fueled motors will provide an extra boost to the Atlas 5's first stage, powered by a Russian-made RD-180 main engine that burns kerosene and liquid oxygen propellants.

The combined power of the boosters and main engine will give the Atlas 5 around 2.6 million pounds of thrust at liftoff.

The June 27 launch will mark the first Atlas 5 flight of the year, and the 80th Atlas 5 launch since the rocket debuted in August 2002. It will be ULA's third mission of 2019, following two Delta 4 launches earlier in the year.
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Built by Lockheed Martin, the AEHF satellites provide secure communications services to the U.S. military, working together in a network the Air Force says is resilient to jamming, cyber attacks, and even nuclear war. The AEHF spacecraft are positioned in geostationary orbit more than 22,000 miles (nearly 36,000 kilometers) over the equator, using a cross-linked architecture allowing the satellites to relay signals between one another without transmitting to ground stations.

The AEHF 5 satellite's launch comes after the launch of four previous AEHF spacecraft in 2010, 2012, 2013 and 2018, all on Atlas 5 rockets.

Once the Atlas 5 rocket carrying the AEHF 5 satellite blasts off from Cape Canaveral, the launch campaign for the following Atlas 5 mission will begin in July with the stacking of a new rocket assigned to send Boeing's CST-100 Starliner crew capsule into orbit on an unpiloted test flight to the International Space Station.

The Starliner's test flight is scheduled for liftoff no earlier than Aug. 17, and the demonstration mission will pave the way for crewed launches using the Atlas 5 rocket and Starliner capsule, perhaps as soon as late this year.

tnt22

Опубликована брошюра миссии

aehf5_mob.pdf - 3.9 MB, 2 стр, 2019-06-07 21:57:34 UTC

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ЦитатаAtlas V 551 takes shape for AEHF-5 satellite launch

June 7, 2019 -- It will require a substantial amount of energy to launch the Air Force's fifth Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF-5) military communications satellite to its lofty orbit above Earth, and United Launch Alliance technicians are readying the powerful Atlas V rocket that will perform the mission.

Five solid rocket boosters (SRBs) and the Centaur upper stage have been attached to the first stage at ULA's Vertical Integration Facility (VIF) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, completing the initial buildup of the launch vehicle.

The work follows the first stage hoisting aboard the mobile launch platform (MLP) on May 17.

The SRBs are known as AJ-60As and each deliver 380,000 pounds of peak thrust during launch. Aerojet Rocketdyne has supplied 110 SRBs flown on Atlas V since 2003 with a flawless track record.

Mating of the Centaur continued ULA's efficiency process known as OVI, or Off-site Vertical Integration. In a separate facility last month, the Centaur was raised upright and mated to the interstage adapter that will connect to the Atlas first stage. Technicians then fitted the lower sections of the payload fairing and a stiffener deck around the stage.

The fully assembled structure was brought to the VIF for hoisting atop the rocket. The OVI eliminates multiple lifting operations at the VIF and saves several days in the pre-launch schedule.

The hydrogen-fueled Centaur will employ the long-duration coast and multiple restart capabilities of its Aerojet Rocketdyne RL10C-1 cryogenic engine to fire three times during the five-and-a-half-hour launch sequence to deliver the AEHF-5 satellite to a highly optimized geosynchronous transfer orbit.

With the Atlas V now assembled, the rocket will come alive with the application of power to undergo extensive testing to ensure systems are checked and validated for the launch.

Later in June, the encapsulated payload will arrive at the VIF from its payload processing facility and lifted atop the rocket, completing the 197-foot-tall Atlas V.

ULA is scheduled to launch the AEHF-5 spacecraft for the U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center on June 27.

tnt22

https://www.losangeles.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/1869045/aehf-5-encapsulated-ahead-of-june-launch/
ЦитатаAEHF-5 Encapsulated Ahead of June Launch
SMC Public Affairs / Published June 06, 2019

LOS ANGELES AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. --
The U.S. Air Force's fifth Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF-5) communication satellite was encapsulated ­­­June 5 at Astrotech Space Operations processing facility in Florida.

The encapsulation of AEHF-5 in the United Launch Alliance Atlas V launch vehicle payload fairing is a significant milestone in AEHF-5's launch process as it marks the completion of all major testing activity prior to launch. AEHF-5 is now ready to make the journey to Space Launch Complex-41, where it will be mated with its Atlas V launch vehicle. The launch window is currently scheduled to open at 06:00 a.m. EDT on June 27.

AEHF is a joint service satellite communications system that will provide survivable, global, secure, protected, and jam-resistant communications for high-priority military ground, sea, and air assets. The AEHF system is the follow-on to the Milstar system, augmenting, improving, and expanding the Department of Defense's MILSATCOM architecture.

AEHF-5 was procured from Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company by the MILSATCOM Systems Directorate, part of the Air Force's Space and Missile Systems Center. The MILSATCOM Systems Directorate plans, acquires, and sustains space-based global communications in support of the President, Secretary of Defense, and combat forces. The MILSATCOM enterprise consists of satellites, terminals and control stations, and provides communications for more than 16,000 air, land, and sea platforms.

tnt22

15.06.2019 16:00:54 #13 Последнее редактирование: 15.06.2019 16:01:51 от tnt22
http://www.ulalaunch.com/missions/atlas-v-aehf-5
Цитата• Launch Date: Thursday, June 27, 2019
• Launch Time: The two-hour launch window opens at 8:27 a.m. EDT
• Launch Broadcast: 8:07 a.m. EDT
12:27 - 14:27 UTC 27.06.2019 (15:27 - 17:27 ДМВ 27.06.2019)
Начало трансляции за 20 мин до пуска. Адрес трансляции на ТыТрубе будет сообщен позже.

tnt22

ЦитатаJun 16, 2019 21:20

AEHF-5, meet your ride into space

June 16, 2019 -- The 80th Atlas V rocket has been topped with its sophisticated payload, the U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center's fifth Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF-5) spacecraft that will provide an unbreakable line of communications to the nation's warfighters. 


The motorized transporter delivered the encapsulated AEHF-5 satellite to the VIF. Photo: United Launch Alliance

United Launch Alliance technicians successfully performed the delicate task of attaching the encapsulated satellite atop the Centaur upper stage on Saturday, June 15 inside the 30-story Vertical Integration Facility (VIF) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

The operations began in the predawn hours as AEHF-5 was transported from its processing facility to Space Launch Complex-41 and parked at the doorway of the VIF.

Crews attached the heavy-duty overhead crane to the payload and deftly hoisted it into the assembly building for connection to the launcher, completing the vertical integration.

AEHF-5 was encapsulated within the payload fairing at its offsite processing facility. The composite shroud measures 18 feet (5.4 meters) in diameter and 68 feet (20.7 meters) long, and protects the satellite during atmospheric ascent.

The fairing features the AEHF-5 mission logo designed by the Air Force. The emblem includes the national flags of the U.S., Canada, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom, all partners in the AEHF program.


The encapsulated AEHF-5 satellite was hoisted atop the Atlas V rocket Saturday morning. Photo: United Launch Alliance

The Integrated Systems Test (IST) will be conducted next to verify the electrical connectivity between the Atlas V and its payload. Final closeouts of the compartments of the launch vehicle will follow.

Rollout of the Atlas V from the VIF to the launch pad is planned for June 25 in preparation for liftoff on June 27 at 8:27 a.m. EDT (1227 UTC).

The AEHF satellite constellation is designed to keep communications flowing between the military and civilian leadership in any extreme wartime environment. AEHF-5, like its predecessors, was built in a collaboration between Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman to route communications to strategic and tactical users.

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https://www.afspc.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/1879889/smc-ready-for-summer-of-launch-liftoff/
ЦитатаSMC Ready for Summer of Launch Liftoff
SMC Public Affairs / Published June 18, 2019

LOS ANGELES AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. --
Summer of 2019 heralds "Summer of Launch" for the Space and Missile Systems Center, the nation's launch vehicle procurer of choice. SMC leads the Department of Defense launch community as the organization celebrates its momentous milestones over a 31-day period.
...
Just three days later, on June 27, the Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF)-5 mission, a direct insertion into Geostationary Earth Orbit, will lift off on United Launch Alliance's Atlas V using their five solid-booster configuration (AV-551). SMC ordered the Atlas V 551 for this mission, the most powerful Atlas rocket available, specifically to maximize the space vehicle's resiliency and on-orbit capability. On the same AEHF-5 mission, SMC's Launch Enterprise Systems Directorate - Mission Manifest Office, in partnership with NASA, will demonstrate two firsts: An accelerated launch integration capability via the EZ-1 satellite vehicle and a multi-manifested satellite vehicle separation prior to the primary space vehicle separation. This launch will mark the 10th Atlas V 551 launch and 80th Atlas V launch. National security space launches boast a perfect legacy of success - 76 out of 76 - due to SMC's focus on ensuring all requirements are met through rigorous systems engineering and mission assurance.
...
The future of launch awaits!

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Перенос пуска на 9 июля
ЦитатаULA‏Подлинная учетная запись @ulalaunch 23 июн.

LAUNCH ALERT: The launch of the #AtlasV #AEHF5 is delayed due to a vehicle battery failure discovered during final processing. Additional time is needed for our team to evaluate and replace the battery. Launch is targeted for NET Tuesday, July 9. http://bit.ly/av_aehf5