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LADEE - Minotaur V - 07.09.2013 -- Wallops/MARS

Автор instml, 01.07.2012 19:06:12

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Цитата2013
July 14 - LADEE - Minotaur V - MARS LP-0B
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LADEE Project Manager Update
ЦитатаNASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) Mission is making great progress towards its 2013 launch to explore the lunar environment. Work is being completed in parallel in five major areas: the radiator panel, the main structure of the spacecraft, the propulsion system, the instruments, and the launch vehicle.

The radiator panel is a flat octagonal metal panel that sits at the top of the spacecraft and holds almost all of the electronics, sensors, and power controls for the rest of the satellite. It is almost a small spacecraft all on its own; so integrating it is a major step for the LADEE Mission. Engineers at NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif., have pieced together the radiator panel with the avionics and power control unit, the battery, the star tracker, the inertial measurement unit, one of the two omni-antennas that allow us to command the spacecraft, the medium-gain antenna used to transmit science data to the ground, and a version of the flight control software. Other important components still to come are the communications transponder and two larger science instruments - the Neutral Mass Spectrometer (NMS), led by Paul Mahaffy at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., and the Lunar Laser Communications Demonstration (LLCD) technology demonstration led by NASA Goddard and built by MIT Lincoln Labs.

The main spacecraft structure is a lightweight, yet extremely strong, metal composite frame that holds everything together. It will carry four reaction wheels to help steer the spacecraft, along with solar arrays that will help generate power to this structure. Before NASA engineers begin integrating it, the structure has to be tested to make sure it is strong enough for the launch loads. During the tests, the structure was placed on a special table designed to intentionally put the structure through rigorous conditions and test its strength; that's when we encountered a problem - the test table gave an unexpected, big jolt to the structure. Amazingly, the structure held up to the jolt, but as a precaution, we switched to a second structure that had already been built for just this type of contingency. That second structure is now in strength testing and soon will go through a "bake-out," which removes possible contaminants from it. Meanwhile, a big electrical harness that attaches to the main structure and carries power from the solar arrays to the radiator panel, as well with commands to the propulsion system, is assembled and has already completed its own bake-out.

The propulsion system, which will be used to travel to the moon and go into orbit around it to conduct science observations, completed its bake-out in May. Engineers then inspected the alignment of its thrusters and exercised its functions with simulated commands. Everything looks good, so we will soon begin to integrate it with the rest of the spacecraft at NASA Ames..

While the spacecraft is being tested and assembled, the science teams have been completing their work on the LADEE instruments. As each instrument is finished, it goes through a pre-shipment, or "pre-ship," review to look at all of its test data and verification documentation, and approve its delivery for integration with the spacecraft. So far, the Lunar Dust EXperiment (LDEX) instrument led by Mihaly Horanyi at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colo., is all done, having wrapped up its pre-ship review. The UltraViolet Spectrometer (UVS), led by Tony Colaprete at NASA Ames, is following closely behind. Because these two science instruments will be integrated onto the radiator panel, they need to be completed soon. The NMS and the LLCD are still being tested and are scheduled to arrive in the fall.

Finally, Orbital Sciences Corp., is making progress on its design reviews of the Minotaur V launch vehicle that will lift LADEE into space. This month at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility's launch complex in Virginia, a team performed a Launch Vehicle Pathfinder. This is an important exercise that involved a large part of the LADEE team, to practice bringing the launch vehicle segments together at the launch range and stacking everything together as if preparing for the launch. This exercise demonstrated all of the transportation steps work, the equipment is ready, and that all the many parts fit together properly.
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/LADEE/news/2012-06-27-pm_update.html
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LADEE Bake-out

The propulsion system for NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) Mission sits in a thermal cage after coming out of a bake-out chamber.

Image credit: NASA Ames/Dominic Hart.

ACD12-0077-016

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/LADEE/multimedia/ladee-propulsion-bake-out.html



Minotaur V at NASA Wallops

An inert Minotaur V launch vehicle is erected on the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport's pad 0B at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia during a pathfinder exercise for NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) Mission.

Image credit: NASA Wallops/Jackie Adkins

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/LADEE/multimedia/minotaur-v-wallops.html



Wide-angle view of Minotaur V at NASA Wallops

A wide-angle view of an inert Minotaur V launch vehicle is erected on the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport's pad 0B at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia during a pathfinder exercise for NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) Mission.

Image credit: NASA Wallops/Jackie Adkins

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/LADEE/multimedia/wallops-minotaurV-wideangle.html
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ЦитатаNASA Picks Loral for $230M Laser Com Demo
ЦитатаPARIS -- NASA is investing $230 million in an experiment to test laser optical communications between a geostationary-orbiting satellite and a NASA ground terminal in the United States in an unusual hosted-payload contract with satellite builder Space Systems/Loral (SS/L), NASA and SS/L said.

The 175-kilogram Laser Communications Relay Demonstration (LCRD) terminal, now in development at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, will be placed aboard a yet-unselected commercial telecommunications satellite that Palo Alto, Calif.-based SS/L hopes to have ready for launch as soon as 2016.

The LCRD terminal would permit high-speed communication of data between the satellite and a NASA-developed ground terminal to be located in the western United States, meaning that whatever commercial satellite SS/L finds for the experiment will need to have a look angle over the United States. NASA has said it is tentatively planning LCRD ground stations in Hawaii and Southern California, taking advantage of work being done for NASA's Lunar Atmosphere Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) mission to lunar orbit scheduled for 2013.

A supplemental LADEE payload will test laser links between lunar orbit and Earth. The LADEE laser terminal is being built by MIT Lincoln Laboratory, a federally funded research and development center in Lexington, Mass.

LCRD will be NASA's first hosted-payload arrangement. Unlike most hosted-payload contracts, in which a satellite owner negotiates with the owner of the hosted payload, NASA has contracted with SS/L to manage the entire process, meaning SS/L will find a suitable commercial customer and negotiate contract terms with the customer within a NASA-fixed budget that is paid to SS/L, according to Michael Weiss, LCRD project manager at Goddard Space Flight Center.

That will mean SS/L will be responsible for compensating the satellite owner for the on-board power -- 600 watts -- that the laser terminal requires, and for a share of the launch costs.

In an April 12 interview, Weiss said NASA would like to operate the LCRD for two years. He said NASA received several bids for the contract before settling on the SS/L bid.

Given the normal two- to three-year cycle of satellite production, it is likely that the satellite has not yet been contracted. In a statement, SS/L said that the optical module and the ground stations that will communicate with it are still in development, and that SS/L "will work with its commercial customers to identify an appropriate host satellite for the demonstration."

In addition to being the most successful supplier of commercial telecommunications satellites in recent years among U.S. builders, SS/L has specialized in large, high-power spacecraft -- 20 kilowatts of on-board power is not uncommon -- that presumably would find it easier to accommodate the LCRD than a smaller or lower-power spacecraft.

Most commercial telecommunications satellites are launched aboard European or Russian rockets, a market reality that could pose difficulties for NASA if it views hosted payloads as a promising new avenue to test technology without paying for an entire satellite and launch. Current U.S. government policy prohibits the use of a non-U.S. vehicle to launch U.S. government hardware if a U.S. alternative is available, unless the mission receives a specific waiver.

But Weiss said the LCRD mission may not need to seek a waiver. He said the agency is formulating a hosted-payload policy that reflects the new hosted-payload opportunities for which NASA is not the host agency.

The use of laser terminals for satellite communications -- both between satellites in orbit and between satellites and ground terminals -- has been the focus of much investment in Europe, but less so in the United States.

The French and German governments have sponsored laser communications terminals to fly aboard a geostationary-orbiting data-relay satellite that communicated with low-orbiting Earth observation spacecraft carrying similar terminals. More recently, Germany's Tesat Spacecom of Backnang, Germany, has sold laser terminals for use by the 19-nation European Space Agency (ESA) and the 27-nation European Union as part of their Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) program.

ESA has contracted with Astrium Services of Europe to manage a data-relay service that will use laser terminals on two geostationary-orbiting satellites to speed Earth observation data delivery to ground users from low-orbiting GMES satellites.

Tesat had hoped that a large U.S. government demand for laser terminals would follow the successful use of laser terminals to exchange data between the German government's TerraSAR-X radar Earth observation satellite and the U.S. Missile Defense Agency's Near Field Infrared Experiment, or NFIRE, missile-warning satellite. TerraSAR-X and NFIRE, each equipped with a Tesat-built laser communications terminal, exchanged reproducible data at speeds of 5.5 gigabits per second for several months in 2008 following a bilateral U.S.-German government agreement, according to Tesat.

Despite a Tesat agreement with Fairfax, Va.-based General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems to promote the Tesat technology in the United States, the U.S. government demand has not materialized, and Tesat has focused on European government programs.

Laser communications have the advantage of operating in a section of the electromagnetic spectrum whose frequencies are not regulated by the International Telecommunication Union, a United Nations affiliate.
http://www.spacenews.com/civil/120410-loral-host-payload-nasa-lasercom.html
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ЦитатаLADEE Project Manager Update
04.09.12
ЦитатаNASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) has received its integrated propulsion system that will enable the spacecraft to reach the moon. Achieving this milestone means the LADEE observatory is one step closer to launching its 2013 mission to explore the lunar environment.

The LADEE propulsion system, built by Space Systems/Loral, Palo Alto, Calif., features a commercially-proven technology. The propulsion system is a variant of the mission critical capabilities used for many years on geostationary satellites to provide television, radio, broadband internet, meteorology and other services.

The LADEE team now has most of the flight hardware components available, and has entered the spacecraft's integration phase. During this phase, the LADEE team will attach hardware components to the various parts of the spacecraft structure, starting with the top radiator panel. This panel contains most of the spacecraft's active electronic systems, except the propulsion system.

As each component is attached, it is tested to verify it was connected and works properly. So far, the team has attached a harness for the electrical wiring and a component to power up the spacecraft, and is preparing to attach the flight battery.

Strength testing of the modular common bus sections - the main super-structure of the spacecraft - built by Vanguard Space Technologies, San Diego, Calif., is about to begin. The bus will be fitted with models of all of the components, so that it can be tested to ensure it is strong enough to handle the rigors of launch. When all of the components of the radiator panel have been integrated and tested, then the panel will be attached to the main structure, along with the integrated propulsion system to complete the spacecraft.

While the spacecraft is being completed, the science teams will finish work on the LADEE instruments. After the team has a completed the spacecraft and instruments, they all will come together and form the LADEE observatory.
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/LADEE/news/2012-04-09-pm_update.html
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ЦитатаSS/L Propels To NASA... The LADEE Checks For Moon Dust
ЦитатаMarch 15, 2012

[SatNews] Delivery comes ahead of schedule, next stop the moon...

Space Systems/Loral (SS/L) (NASDAQ: LORL), a leading provider of commercial satellites, today announced that it completed on time delivery of a new propulsion system to NASA. The propulsion system for the Lunar Atmosphere Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft was delivered to NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, on Thursday, March 8 following successful completion of the final delivery reviews and sign-off.

"Designing spacecraft systems and teaming with commercial manufacturers is helping the NASA Ames-led LADEE project meet demand for lower-cost approaches to science missions," said Stevan Spremo, deputy project manager for LADEE at NASA Ames.

Photos of the LADEE propulsion system after it was delivered to NASA Ames. NASA Ames/Dominic Hart. More SS/L LADEE information is available here.

The LADEE mission to collect lunar dust and study the moon's atmosphere is key to helping researchers plan for future exploration. The propulsion system, which SS/L delivered, will enable LADEE to reach the moon. Using SS/L to provide the system leverages the capability of commercially proven technology for U.S. Government missions.

"In this era of fiscal constraint it is important for the commercial sector to share our extensive heritage and capabilities with government organizations such as NASA," said John Celli, president of Space Systems/Loral. "We have enjoyed teaming with our neighbors here in Northern California, who have designed a very versatile spacecraft platform for unmanned space exploration, and we stand ready to provide future support as needed."

NASA's LADEE spacecraft is a small observatory that will orbit the moon to determine the global density, composition, and time variability of the lunar atmosphere before it is perturbed by further human activity. Its secondary mission will be testing a new spacecraft architecture called the Modular Common Bus, which is being developed by NASA as a flexible, low cost, spacecraft for both orbiting and landing on the moon and other deep space targets. LADEE also will carry an experimental payload that will demonstrate the capability of long distance laser communications.

The LADEE propulsion system built by Space Systems/Loral is a variant of the mission critical systems used over many years on the geostationary satellites that the company provides for television, radio, broadband Internet, meteorology and a host of other services. Space Systems/Loral has more commercial satellite transponders on orbit than any other manufacturer and has built the world's highest capacity broadband satellites. Currently there are 67 SS/L-built satellites orbiting Earth.
http://www.satnews.com/cgi-bin/story.cgi?number=622081249

Цитатаhttp://www.ssloral.com/html/pressreleases/pr20120314.html



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2012-07-17

LADEE
Launch date slipped from 7/14/2013 to August 2013.
GSFC Cutting Edge, volume 8, issue 4, Summer 2012, p.12.

http://msdb.gsfc.nasa.gov/change_log.php
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http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/LADEE/main/index.html

Launch date: 2013
Launch site: Wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, Va.
Launch vehicle: Minotaur V
Mission duration: Approximately 160 days (30 days to travel to the moon, 30 days for checkout and 100 days for science operations)
Mass: Approximately 844 pounds (383 kilograms)
Power: Approximately 295 Watts

NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) is a robotic mission that will orbit the moon to gather detailed information about the lunar atmosphere, conditions near the surface and environmental influences on lunar dust. A thorough understanding of these characteristics will address long-standing unknowns, and help scientists understand other planetary bodies as well.

The LADEE spacecraft's modular common spacecraft bus, or body, is an innovative way of transitioning away from custom designs and toward multi-use designs and assembly-line production, which could drastically reduce the cost of spacecraft development, just as the Ford Model T did for automobiles.

Onboard, LADEE will include three science instruments and a technology demonstration.

    * Ultraviolet and Visible Light Spectrometer: will determine the composition of the lunar atmosphere by analyzing light signatures of materials it finds.
    * Neutral Mass Spectrometer: will measure variations in the lunar atmosphere over multiple lunar orbits with the moon in different space environments.
    * Lunar Dust Experiment: will collect and analyze samples of any lunar dust particles in the tenuous atmosphere. These measurements will help scientists address a mystery: was lunar dust, electrically charged by solar ultraviolet light, responsible for pre-sunrise horizon glow that Apollo astronauts saw?
    * Lunar Laser Communications Demonstration: will demonstrate the use of lasers instead of radio waves to achieve broadband speeds to communicate with Earth.


http://novosti-kosmonavtiki.ru/forum/messages/forum14/topic9573/message1021623/#message1021623

2013
August 12 - LADEE - Minotaur V - MARS LP-0B
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NASA's LADEE Spacecraft Gets Final Science Instrument Installed
Oct. 25, 2012





MOFFETT FIELD, Calif. - Engineers at NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif., have installed the third and final science instrument that will fly onboard NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE).

LADEE is a robotic mission that will orbit the moon to gather detailed information about the lunar atmosphere, conditions near the surface and environmental influences on lunar dust.

"The installation of the final science instrument to LADEE's flight structure in the clean room at Ames is an important step toward completing the spacecraft build and testing," said Butler Hine, LADEE project manager at Ames. "Now that the three science instruments are fully integrated onto the spacecraft, it has become a full-fledged, high-precision space observatory."

In addition to LADEE's science instruments, a technology demonstration also will fly onboard. The science instruments include the Ultraviolet and Visible Light Spectrometer (UVS), which will examine the composition of the lunar atmosphere by analyzing light signatures of materials it finds; the Neutral Mass Spectrometer (NMS), set to measure variations in the lunar atmosphere over multiple lunar orbits with the moon in different space environments and the Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX), which will collect and analyze samples of any lunar dust particles in the tenuous atmosphere. The technology demonstration payload is called the Lunar Laser Communications Demonstration, and will enable the LADEE spacecraft to use lasers instead of radio waves to achieve broadband speeds to communicate with Earth.

"We now have our full science suite, and LADEE has the tools it needs to address mysteries and questions that have lingered since Apollo," said Rick Elphic, LADEE project scientist. "Was electrostatically lofted lunar dust responsible for the horizon glow that the astronauts observed? LDEX and UVS will settle that question once and for all. What makes the exotic, tenuous atmosphere of the moon breathe and change? NMS and UVS will tell us where the different species come from, how they move and how they are lost. A mission like LADEE has been needed since Apollo, which left us with tantalizing hints about the dust and an exotic, tenuous atmosphere."

LADEE now begins its environmental test phase and will undergo tests simulating the conditions it will face during launch and operations in space. These tests include acoustic (the loud roar of the rocket), vibration (the shaking of the rocket), shock (the jolt when stages separate), and thermal-vacuum (the hot and cold vacuum conditions of deep space).

LADEE's launch in August 2013 will mark several firsts. It will be the first payload to launch on a U.S. Air Force Minotaur V rocket integrated by Orbital Sciences Corp., and the first deep space mission to launch from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/ames/news/releases/2012/12-76AR.html
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LADEE Project Manager Update
11.29.2012



   Engineers at NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif., recently completed the initial electromagnetic interference tests of NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) Observatory. LADEE is a robotic mission that will orbit the moon to gather detailed information about the lunar atmosphere, conditions near the surface and environmental influences on lunar dust.

Now that all of the science instruments are integrated onto the spacecraft, testing electromagnetic interference determines whether the various spacecraft systems and science instruments will interfere with each other either by emission or absorption of electromagnetic forces. Although each spacecraft system goes through individual testing, only a test of the complete observatory can show problems missed by earlier tests. So far, LADEE has received a clean bill of health and all systems work together harmoniously.

The electromagnetic interference tests are the beginning of a variety of tests aimed to simulate the conditions LADEE will face during launch and operation in space. These tests include acoustic (the loud roar of the rocket), vibration (the shaking of the rocket), shock (the jolt when stages of the rocket separate), and thermal-vacuum (the hot and cold vacuum conditions of deep space). Engineers plan to begin the acoustic and vibration tests at specialized facilities in December 2012, so LADEE is being prepared for shipment fr om Ames to Southern California.

Thankfully, the impact of Hurricane Sandy on NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia wh ere LADEE is scheduled to launch in August 2013 was minimal and will not affect the mission.

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/LADEE/news/2012-11-29-pm_update.html
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LADEE Project Manager Update
1.03.13





Engineers at NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif., recently attached all of the solar panels to NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) observatory, and prepared to transport the observatory to the National Technical Systems mechanical testing facility in Santa Clarita, Calif. LADEE is a robotic mission that will orbit the moon to gather detailed information about the lunar atmosphere, conditions near the surface and environmental influences on lunar dust.

This is an important phase for the mission, because any problems with the spacecraft often are discovered during the tests. Engineers will perform a variety of tests to simulate the environment LADEE must face during its launch and operation in space, including acoustic, vibration, shock, and thermal-vacuum conditions. During the acoustic testing, which takes place first, large speakers will blast sound at the observatory to simulate the roar of the rocket at launch. The second test involves engineers mounting the observatory to a large vibration table to shake the observatory at different frequencies and accelerations and simulate the vibration of the rocket as it climbs to space. The third test simulates the shock that occurs when the rocket stages separate. Thermal-Vacuum testing, which simulates the extreme heat and cold of space, will happen after the LADEE observatory returns to Ames.

NASA used a special truck with equipment that maintains a clean environment to ship the observatory to the test facility. The observatory itself sat in a container designed to insulate it from vibration, cold, humidity and dirt. The truck's environmental control system fed clean, dry, warm gas into the observatory's transport container as it traveled to southern California. Once at the test facility, the observatory was removed from its container and prepared for testing.

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/LADEE/news/2013-1-03_update.html
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"Были когда-то и мы рысаками!!!"

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LADEE Arrives at Wallops for Moon Mission
06.04.13

 

 The NASA Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) arrived today at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility to begin final processing for its trip to the moon later this year. LADEE is a robotic mission that will orbit the moon to gather detailed information about the lunar atmosphere, conditions near the surface and environmental influences on lunar dust. A thorough understanding of these characteristics will address long-standing unknowns, and help scientists understand other planetary bodies as well. LADEE has three science instruments and one technology demonstration onboard.

 LADEE's scheduled Sep. 5, 2013, launch will mark several firsts. It will be the first payload to launch on a U.S. Air Force Minotaur V rocket integrated by Orbital Sciences Corp., and the first deep space mission to launch from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility.

 NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington funds the LADEE mission, a cooperative effort led by NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif. Ames is responsible for managing the mission, building the spacecraft and performing mission operations. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., is responsible for managing the science instruments and technology demonstration payload, and the science operations center. Wallops is responsible for launch vehicle integration, launch services, and launch range operations. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala., manages LADEE within the Lunar Quest Program Office.

 For more information about the LADEE Mission, visit:http://www.nasa.gov/LADEE

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wallops/news/ladeearrival.html
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wge0R-T_xBI
ЦитатаОпубликовано 01.07.2013
 
 NASA Ames' Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) is a robotic mission that will orbit the moon to gather detailed information about the lunar atmosphere, conditions near the surface and environmental influences on lunar dust.

LADEE's scheduled Sep. 6, 2013, launch will mark several firsts. It will be the first payload to launch on a U.S. Air Force Minotaur V rocket integrated by Orbital Sciences Corp., and the first deep space mission to launch from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility.

Credit: NASA Ames/Dana Berry
Note: Animation is silent with no audio/music track included.

For more information about the LADEE mission, please visit http://www.nasa.gov/LADEE
For more information about NASA Ames, please visit http://www.nasa.gov/ames

http://youtu.be/Wge0R-T_xBI
"Были когда-то и мы рысаками!!!"

Salo

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAz_xHUe168
ЦитатаОпубликовано 07.07.2013

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/a...

NASA Ames' Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) is a robotic mission that will orbit the moon to gather detailed information about the lunar atmosphere, conditions near the surface and environmental influences on lunar dust.

LADEE's scheduled Sep. 5, 2013, launch will mark several firsts. It will be the first payload to launch on a U.S. Air Force Minotaur V rocket integrated by Orbital Sciences Corp., and the first deep space mission to launch from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility.

Credit: NASA Ames/Dana Berry
Note: Animation is silent with no audio/music track included.

For more information about the LADEE mission, please visit http://www.nasa.gov/LADEE
For more information about NASA Ames, please visit http://www.nasa.gov/ames

http://youtu.be/iAz_xHUe168
"Были когда-то и мы рысаками!!!"

Salo

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nfN4EVjrrzg
ЦитатаОпубликовано 11.07.2013  

NASA Ames' Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) is a robotic mission that will orbit the moon to gather detailed information about the lunar atmosphere, conditions near the surface and environmental influences on lunar dust.

LADEE's scheduled Sep. 6, 2013, launch will mark several firsts. It will be the first payload to launch on a U.S. Air Force Minotaur V rocket integrated by Orbital Sciences Corp., and the first deep space mission to launch from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility.

Release Date: 11 July 2013

Credit: NASA Ames/Dana Berry
Note: Animation is silent with no audio/music track included.

For more information about the LADEE mission, please visit http://www.nasa.gov/LADEE
For more information about NASA Ames, please visit http://www.nasa.gov/ames

http://youtu.be/nfN4EVjrrzg
"Были когда-то и мы рысаками!!!"

Mark

Лазерные системы связи, готовы для Миссии на Луну, 1.8.2013
 
Цитата"Тесты на спутнике LADEE были успешные. Нашa наземная станция будет общаться вместе с двух наземных станций НАСА с лунного спутника LADEE. Поэтому мы хотим продемонстрировать, что оптическая связь для будущих миссий на Марсе и другие направления в солнечной системе является готовым к использованию" - сказал Зоран Sodnik, руководитель ЕКА -Projekts Lunar Optical Communication Link.

Лазерные системы связи в средней инфракрасной областях может быть путь в будущее для передачи больших объемов данных с спутники на орбите Земли, Марса или даже более далекие планеты. Эти системы являются легче, меньше и более энергоэффективными, чем используемые в настоящее время радио систем, что приводит к нижней ожидания согласно расходы Миссии и будут созданы возможности для новых инструментов научного Совета.
Скорость более чем 600 мегабит данных в секунду.

http://www.esa.int/ger/ESA_in_your_country/Germany/Laserkommunikationssystem_bereit_fuer_Mondmission/(print)
Земля - это колыбель разума, но нельзя вечно жить в колыбели. Ц.К.Э

 

che wi


che wi

Inaugural Minotaur V Rocket Scheduled to Launch NASA's LADEE Spacecraft from Wallops

ЦитатаA brand new Minotaur IV rocket is scheduled to launch for the first time from Wallops Flight Facility on September 7th at 03:27 UTC. This vehicle will carry NASA's LADEE (Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer) spacecraft to the Moon.

This video shows animation of the flight profile the rocket will take.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zMt-CQPYt14